SEARCH

Playing with fire?

print   ·   T  T  

TIPS Precautions for a safe and happy Diwali

FESTIVE CHEER Children lighting sparklers Photo: Mohammed Yousuf
FESTIVE CHEER Children lighting sparklers Photo: Mohammed Yousuf

I t's Diwali tomorrow — the festival of lights. While we all enjoy ourselves lighting lamps and bursting firecrackers, here's a word of caution. Let us not mar a happy occasion by sustaining eye injuries when we play with fire. Here are some statistics that point to the gravity of the problem — it has been found that 45 per cent of ocular injuries in children occur at home, of which those caused by firecrackers constitute as much as 10 per cent.

According to Dr. Mohan Rajan, chairman and medical director, Rajan Eye Care Hospital, there has been an increased incidence of eye injuries in children caused by firecrackers in the past few years, mainly because of the negligence of parents and failure to follow simple precautions. The injuries the hospital treats ranges from minimal ones such as corneal abrasion to major ones such as traumatic cataract, corneal tear, retinal detachment, vitreous haemorrhage and ruptured globe.

Most firecracker injuries occur in children aged below 15. They not only cause physical disability but also affect them psychologically, leading to personality disorders that pose a barrier to future opportunities. Experts say injuries caused by rockets are by far the worst, since they rupture the eyeballs which are difficult to salvage. Blast injuries could lead to superficial burns, wherein certain metallic parts could enter the eye and damage it.

The best treatment to save your sight is, therefore, prevention.

In case of any emergency dial 108, 1066 and 0452-2581111. In case medical help is needed, contact Aravind Eye Care Hospital at 4356100; call 4263000 (extn: 3028) for Meenakshi Mission Hospital and Research Centre; ring 2581148 to 50 for Apollo Speciality Hospitals.





More In: METRO PLUS | FEATURES

O
P
E
N

close

Recent Article in METRO PLUS

Saris in pastel hues

The latest collection of saris from Bailou features mica, kantha work from Bangladesh, funny fringes and jamdanis »