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Not quite arch-type

MIRA RAMAKRISHNAN
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It takes a lot more than just interest to excel in a field.

A professional degree in Architecture was something that I longed to pursue since my days in middle school and when the time came, without much effort, I got into an architecture school.

The first semester was a joy ride. But in the second semester of my study, the first blow struck. Architectural design wasn’t all roses as it had seemed. It was hard work and required parallel thinking at various levels. Simply racking your brains did not yield results. You had to have a clear idea and create spaces with great spontaneity and intuition. Superfluous concepts and extravagant forms did nothing to help the situation.

It was at this juncture that I felt that I may not really be cut out for architecture. It was often a battle between the heart and the brain; between doing what you love the most and yet, not being able to give it your best. Add to it the depression of having made the wrong decision, which could cost your career, or even worse, your life. It was a turbulent period.

When a couple of friends broke down and switched courses, I decided to stay on to do what I loved. The following year was a great experience in self-realisation. I tried to relive my love for architecture that had brought me thus far and attempted to combine it with my passion for writing.

Now, I am writing this as I am preparing myself to present a research paper at an international conference of architects. And I must confess that it came to me way more easily than I could have ever imagined.

It’s not always about hard work. Complete dedication for what you do eventually pushes you to strive hard. What is more important is the belief in your decision and the way you stick to it, through thick and thin.

MIRA RAMAKRISHNAN

III year, B. Arch, MIDAS

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