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A challenge and a cause

ARUN VENUGOPAL
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EVENT Amateur corporate and individual enthusiasts are set to tee off at the fourth edition of the Nippon Paint Chennai Corporate Golf Challenge on March 12

COMMON GOAL (From left) Members of the Corporate Golf Challenge Committee Nandita Krishnan, M. Srinivasan, S. Gunasekhar, C. Venugopal and Nimish Tolia PHOTO: R. Ragu
COMMON GOAL (From left) Members of the Corporate Golf Challenge Committee Nandita Krishnan, M. Srinivasan, S. Gunasekhar, C. Venugopal and Nimish Tolia PHOTO: R. Ragu

I t's tee-off time for amateur golfers in the city as the fourth edition of the Nippon Paint Chennai Corporate Golf Challenge (CCGC) is set to take place at the Madras Gymkhana Club on March 12.

The day-long tournament, conducted by the Rotary Club of Madras, will see corporate and individual enthusiasts swinging their clubs for the Jhaver Cup.

Celeb presence

Promoted as a competition that ‘combines serious golf with charity', the CCGC will be bolstered by the presence of star golfer Jyoti Randhawa. “Any golf tournament needs to have a celebrity golfer. Since this is a corporate event, Randhawa's participation will help spearhead our campaign,” says M. Srinivasan, member of the tournament committee.

The former All-India amateur champion will play a ‘friendly' round of golf with players before conducting a coaching clinic for children in the afternoon.

Randhawa will also be present in the evening when his autographed memorabilia goes under the hammer along with other sporting souvenirs.

Proceeds from the tournament and the auction will go towards the community service projects of the Rotary Club of Madras. “The emphasis will be on welfare and education of girls from the disadvantaged sections, besides imparting vocational training to less-privileged children,” says S. Gunasekhar, president of the Rotary Club of Madras.

Social responsibility

“Most of the golfers in the city are from large corporations. While we play together, it is easy to raise money for charity, avers Gunasekhar, outlining the reasons for staging a golf tournament. According to Nandita Krishnan, president-elect, Rotary Club of Madras, such an event is akin to a Corporate Social Responsibility initiative for many companies.

While the tourney will be played with camaraderie and fellowship, there will be no bending of rules, says Srinivasan adding that winners will be rewarded with golfing equipment and trophies. He also expresses the hope that there will be stronger participation from Coimbatore and Bengaluru next year.

Reviving the charm

Last year's edition saw a total of 46 entries comprising 30 teams and 16 individuals, including six players from the armed forces. Gunasekhar is confident there will be a strong representation from other Rotary clubs in Chennai for this year's CCGC. “The Rotary Club of Madras is partnering with The Hindu to bring back the charm of tournaments such as The Hindu Open,” he says with a sense of nostalgia.

CCGC will be governed by the rules of the R&A and a maximum of 108 entries will be registered.

The event will be conducted in the Stableford format and Handicaps will be based on the Callaway scoring system. The trophies and vouchers are sponsored by Nippon Paint.

ARUN VENUGOPAL

While the tourney will be played with camaraderie and fellowship, there will be no bending of rules

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