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Let down by the beloved The Vipralabdha nayika wonders if someone has poisoned her lover’s mind as exemplified by Leela Samson’s expression here.
Let down by the beloved The Vipralabdha nayika wonders if someone has poisoned her lover’s mind as exemplified by Leela Samson’s expression here.

Dance

Vipralabdha nayika: One of the Ashta Nayikas (Learn the Lingo of 14 September 2007), the Vipralabdha is a woman suffering from separation from her beloved. She is differentiated from the Virahotkanthita nayika (Learn the Lingo of 28 September 2007) because unlike the latter, whose lover may be away for any reason, the Vipralabdha nayika is deceived by him. Due to his dalliance with other women, she is upset. Yet she does not reject him. She continues to pine for him. She may complain to her sakhi, sometimes trying to find excuses for him by blaming the wiles of the other woman who has managed to ensnare him. She may wonder if someone has poisoned his mind against her. Or she might send a message saying, “Let’s not even mention any other woman’s name. Just tell him I will welcome him.” Or she may simply describe her suffering, accentuated by feelings of jealousy towards the ‘other’ woman.

A recurring image of a Vipralabdha nayika is one who has spent the night in anticipation. When dawn breaks, she awakes from fitful dosing, and in disappointment casts off her jewellery and flowers.

Music

Bol taan: Like the technique of taan (Learn the Lingo of 21 September 2007), bol taan is a term from Hindustani music. Unique to vocal music, the bol taan is a way of elaborating the music as well as the lyrics. Elaborating the bol taan is considered more difficult than the taan, in which the singer uses only solfa syllables or aakar (Learn the Lingo of 2 March 2007). This is because, in addition to keeping the rules of melody in mind, the singer has to convey the meaning and mood of the song.

If only the technical aspects of the music are kept in mind, there would be something missing from the bol taan. The singer tries to project the mood through stressing or repeating certain words or phrases.


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