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Why this tuition MANIA

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Have tuitions become a necessary evil in our academic world? Do these centres deliver on what they promise? Why do students seek private coaching?

Score-crazy:Youngsters seem to forego co-curricular and extra-curricular activities in order to attend tuition classes.Photo: V. Ganesan
Score-crazy:Youngsters seem to forego co-curricular and extra-curricular activities in order to attend tuition classes.Photo: V. Ganesan

Shanti, 60, in South Chennai, woke up with a start. It was dark but the bicycles were clashing outside and she heard a couple of car doors slamming. She has had to forgo sleep since the house across was turned into a tuition centre. The “batches” start at 5 a.m. and go on till 8 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends. Why do the students need tuitions at all, she asks angrily, wondering where she should take her complaint about the noise.

“The only way I could score maximum was with the help of a private tutor who came home to teach me Kannada,” says Dr. Umanath Nayak, Consultant Head and Neck Oncologist, Apollo Health City, Hyderabad. He chose to study Sanskrit in school in order to score high, but it was taught and was answered in Kannada. When it came to deciding for his son, he took a considered stand, unswayed by the surrounding tuition mania. If a child is doing fairly well academically, sending him to private tuition for better grades is like punishing him for not scoring as well as his peers, he reckons. May be he has other interests, maybe he feels topping is no guarantee for a great future, maybe he is just plain lazy!

Negative impact

Unless the teen is seriously lacking in grades or wants to be proficient in a subject not taught in the curriculum, don’t send him for tuitions, is Dr. Umanath’s advice. “Subjecting him to the mortification of extra tuition — which may be rewarding in terms of better grades, may have an overall negative impact on his psyche in the long term,” he warns. But what do you tell financial consultant Meena who gets a tutor to come home because “her son will not do his home work otherwise?” And students who say that a combination of classroom and tuitions helps them get better clued-in on subjects, three to four hours of private tuition is needed to get doubts clarified, concretise everything they learn in school.

Bina George, Center Director, Growing Stars, an online tutoring company, sees private tuition as helping children realise their potential. Students need it to supplement knowledge and to compensate skill gaps, she said. She doesn’t believe it reflects badly on school teaching because “children need more practice and additional help for better academic performance.” With computer penetration and video technology, online tutoring is bound to get widespread, since there’s no commuting and it is as effective as home tutoring. “Growing Stars has been in the field of one-on-one online tutoring for 10 years,” she said. Continued on Page 2

“These centres promise students the limited seats in creditable higher institutions and social support for them is pledged by parents willing to meet the high cost. Is there a mechanism to identify and discourage the mushrooming of such institutions?”

Will these suggestions help?

* Uniform syllabus at the all-India level

* More sections and better teacher-student ratio

* Revision of examination policy.

* No duties such as election or census for teachers.

* No interference of politicians/bureaucrats in education matters and policies, decisions taken by educational stake-holders.

* Ban on school teachers giving private tuition.

Super 30 is an innovative educational programme under “Ramanujan School of Mathematics”. It tutors 30 meritorious economically-backward students for IIT-JEE. In the last seven years, the centre has produced hundreds of IITians from extremely poor background. During this programme students are provided free coaching, lodging and food.


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