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Water melons become dearer

A.Y.K
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Summer special: Last year a plate of fruit was available for Rs. 7 but now its costs Rs.12
Summer special: Last year a plate of fruit was available for Rs. 7 but now its costs Rs.12

The commonly savoured summer heat resistant, the water melon has now become dearer. A victim or a partner in the rising inflation, a plate of water melon now costs between Rs.10 and 12, an increase of two to four rupees per plate.

“The size of the plate has also turned smaller, we are getting just ten to twelve small pieces,” says Raghunath, an auto driver.

“Last year a plate used to cost five to seven rupees but now it costs Rs.12, an unexpected increase,” says Krishna Rao, a private security guard.

The vendors on the other hand attribute the increase to the shortage of the water melon at the Kothapet fruit market.

“The water melon is now being weighed and sold at the Kothapet fruit market, a kilogram now costs between Rs.12 to Rs.14 depending upon the quality,” says Abhishek, a vendor from the central India.

Scores of vendors cash in on the summer heat and sell pieces of the summer fruit at road sides on major thoroughfares providing some juicy cool stuff to the harried public and at the same time engaging in this seasonal trade that helps them earn some money.

People irrespective of caste and creed descend at these kiosks to eat it. “It all depends on severity of heat, people make a beeline to our stalls,” says Gulab Singh, another vendor at Patny.

The busy market places with adequate parking space turn out to be a preferred spot for these vendors and they don't mind paying bribes to local authorities.

“I make between Rs.300 and Rs.400 and more at times, in other business I don't get to earn this much,” says a vendor.

“We make good money at the place and don't mind paying some money,” says Babloo, a vendor near Secunderabad railway station.

A.Y.K

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