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Shooting from the heart

saraswathy nagarajan
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Genelia D'Souza
Genelia D'Souza

I t would not be wrong to call Genelia D'Souza a Southern Star. She has a string of hits to her credit, especially in Telugu and Tamil. And now she is aiming at expanding her fan following with Santosh Sivan's Urumi , her first Malayalam film, where she plays warrior princess Arackal Ayesha.

“I never thought I would be able to do a role like that. But Santosh gave me a character that was nothing like what I've done before. He threw me a challenge and I took it up,” says the actor.

Genelia had to undergo two weeks of hard training to learn to use the sword, the short stick, and other movements of Kalaripayattu. Ms. Sunshine became the heartthrob of many as Harini in Boys. But Genelia warns her fans that Ayesha is not Harini or Aditi (her character in Jaane Tu… Ya Jaane Na. “Ayesha is so not Genelia. She does not smile at all in the film. I have done several action sequences and did all my stunts myself.”

The management student and top model, with a clutch of brands to her credit, says that her management studies and work in modelling did ease her move to the big screen. It has been a bumpy ride with only Jaane Tu… to highlight as a hit. None of her other films in Hindi ( Chance Pe Dance, Life Partner…) clicked at the box office. Genelia seems to have realised that it would be difficult to do justice to her roles if there were too many characters on her acting palette. “Instead of doing several films at the same time, I have decided to do one each in Hindi, Telugu and Tamil. That way, I can give my best to each film. I am doing Force with John Abraham, which is the remake of Gautam Menon's Khakha Khakhaand an untitled Telugu film with Rana Daggubatti,” she explains.

saraswathy nagarajan

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