New Zealand’s Corey Anderson clubbed the fastest century in the history of one-day internationals from 36 balls as the hosts cruised to a 159-run win over the West Indies in Wednesday’s rain-shortened third one-dayer.

New Zealand reached 283-4 from only 21 overs, with the West Indies only able to manage 124-5 in reply.

Anderson hit 12 sixes and four fours to break the recordby one delivery of a 37-ball century scored by Pakistan’s Shahid Afridi against Sri Lanka which has stood for almost 18 years.

“I went out there thinking I’m going to have to tick over some singles and construct an innings but you hit a couple of boundaries and keep going,” Anderson said.

New Zealand scored at 13 runs per over, and the 23-year-old allrounder finished on 131 not out from only 47 balls.

Captain Brendon McCullum set the momentum of the New Zealand innings when he smashed 33 from 11 balls.

“Some of the batting we saw was once in a lifetime sort of stuff. It was great to watch and those boys will certainly enjoy all the accolades that come their way,” McCullum said.

Ryder took over the pace-setting role when McCullum was caught in the deep, and dashed to his half century in 24 balls with four fours and four sixes. It was a reminder of his best, after he was out for a duck in his comeback game which opened this series.

Ryder, though, was overshadowed by Anderson, who hit four-consecutive sixes off Sunil Narine and also four sixes in an over from Ravi Rampaul whose three overs conceded 64 runs.

Anderson was 95 not out after 35 balls, needing a six to break Afridi’s record and, though unaware of the fact, he swatted the next ball from spinner Nikita Miller out of the ground to break the world record.

The New Zealand innings contained 22 sixes and 22 fours or 220 runs from boundaries. The Queenstown Events Center at which Wednesday’s match was played is a regulation-sized international cricket ground.

The straight boundaries are relatively long, the square boundaries much shorter and the pitch was fast-paced and true, rewarding batsmen who played aggressively.

Ryder withdrew from the New Zealand’s team in February 2012 after being censured for drinking alcohol while recovering from an injury. He refused international selection for the next two years while he tackled personal problems, including his episodes of alcohol-related misbehaviour.

The West Indies were simply overwhelmed by New Zealand’s batting performance on Wednesday and made no attempt at a winning run chase, giving up their series lead.

“Not a good way to start a New Year,” Bravo said. “But we’ve got to give credit to the New Zealand boys.

“The game was shortened and they grabbed it with both hands. They caught us on the back foot, they came out positive and they were fantastic innings from both Anderson and Ryder. There is nothing you can do as a captain and a bowler when they hit the ball so cleanly.”

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