The best way to keep in touch with old traditions is through new technology, claims a tech fan.

AD: Hi, heard that you had gone on a religious tour...

BC: It was simply amazing — the architectural splendours, the mind-boggling engineering... And complete peace of mind. You should have come...

AD: I’m really not interested in…

BC: Your generation is so stuck with its technology, devices and the little pleasures they have to offer that you’re slowly losing touch with your culture.

AD: We pursue our interests, while you follow yours...

BC: And in the process, you forget your roots and your tradition. How much does this generation know about our history, our architecture and…

AD: I disagree — technology does help keep in touch with tradition. In fact, it acts as a bridge between us and our culture...

BC: Oh c'mon...

AD: Really. For instance, you had gone visiting religious places for a whole week. Many others aren't as fortunate as you are, like my grandmother who suffers from arthritis. But I can take her to all the places that you visited, online...

BC: Is that possible?

AD: Today, a lot of temples, churches and mosques have live streaming and webcasts of their religious services, so those who are unable to travel can have a ‘virtual darshan’.

BC: I always knew that there were many ways to reach God…

AD: But I’m sure you’d never have thought that the tablet would one day become a portal that…

BC: Takes us to the Almighty.

AD: Right! Several places of worship also have websites that offer walkthroughs — a multimedia clip that shows you around to give you a feel of the place.

BC: I'm told that popular video sites like YouTube also have several such clips...

AD: Absolutely. Do you think all this would have been possible a decade ago?

BC: Perhaps not, but I still feel that the passion has waned. It's still the older generation that wants to use technology to stay in touch with their tradition...

AD: A cousin of mine learns Carnatic music from a teacher through Skype.

BC: So what's the big deal? It's a bit like e-learning, isn't it?

AD: The student lives in Michigan and his teacher, in Mylapore. Apparently, the boy's parents were keen that he should learn music only from that teacher, so they worked it out in such a way that he would have exclusive classes online.

BC: So a computer and a set of speakers transformed into a music classroom.

AD: And almost 12,000 kilometres were reduced to nothing at the click of a button. Yet you blame technology...

BC: The examples you give are aberrations...

AD: Absolutely not. While on the topic of music, do you know the kind of interest a live podcast of a Carnatic recital generates? Millions who cannot be at the hall can tune in on their mobiles.

BC: I can't imagine staying glued to my mobile for that long. Think of the number of personal loan, credit card and club membership calls that I might miss.

AD: Go ahead, be sarcastic, but that won't take away from the fact that technology only helps bring people closer to their roots. A smartphone or a laptop with an internet connection can take you to a church in Goa, a temple in Rishikesh or to a concert in Australia.

BC: Finally, mankind has been enlightened on the key benefit of greater Internet speeds and faster downloads.

AD: I don't understand.

BC: People can now rest assured that their prayers can reach God faster through the Net.

AD: And what about His blessings?

BC: Well, they can download it at their leisure.

sureshl.india@gmail.com

RELATED NEWS

Closer to the madding crowdMay 15, 2013