It may not much longer to make fuel cells practical and affordable. Fuel cells operate by converting chemical energy (from hydrogen or a hydrocarbon fuel such as methane) into an electric current.

Oxygen ions travel from the cathode through the electrolyte toward the anode, where they oxidize the fuel to produce a current of electrons back toward the cathode.

That may seem simple enough in principle, but until now, SOFCs have been more suited for the laboratory rather than the office or garage.

With advances in nanostructured devices, lower operating temperatures, and the use of an abundant fuel source and cheaper materials, a group of researchers led by Shriram Ramanathan at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are increasingly optimistic about the commercial viability of the technology.

Ramanathan says they may, in fact, soon become the go-to technology for those on the go.

The obstacles to using SOFCs to charge laptops and phones or drive the next generation of cars and trucks have remained reliability, temperature, and cost.

Critical advances

In two studies appearing in the Journal of Power Sources this month, Ramanathan's team reported several critical advances in SOFC technology that may quicken their pace to market.

In the first paper, Ramanathan's group demonstrated stable and functional all-ceramic thin-film SOFCs that do not contain any platinum, according to a Harvard University press release.

In thin-film SOFCs, the electrolyte is reduced to a hundredth or even a thousandth of its usual scale, using densely packed layers of special ceramic films, each just nanometres in thickness. These micro-SOFCs usually incorporate platinum electrodes, but they can be expensive and unreliable.

“If you use porous metal electrodes,” explains Ramanathan, “they tend to be inherently unstable over long periods of time. They start to agglomerate and create open circuits in the fuel cells.”

Win-win situation

Ramanathan's platinum-free micro-SOFC eliminates this problem, resulting in a win-win: lower cost and higher reliability.

In a second paper published this month, the team demonstrated a methane-fueled micro-SOFC operating at less than 500° Celsius, a feat that is relatively rare in the field.

Traditional SOFCs have been operating at about 800°C, but such high temperatures are only practical for stationary power generation. In recent years, materials scientists have been working to reduce the required operating temperature to about 300°C, a range Ramanathan calls the “sweet spot.”

Moreover, when fuel cells operate at lower temperatures, material reliability is less critical — allowing, for example, the use of less expensive ceramics and metallic interconnects — and the start-up time can be shorter.

“Low temperature is a holy grail in this field,” says Ramanathan. “If you can realize high-performance solid-oxide fuel cells that operate in the 300°C range, you can use them in transportation vehicles and portable electronics, and with different types of fuels.”