Ninety per cent of Gen Y surveyed worldwide check their smart phones for updates in e-mail, texts, and social media sites, often before they get out of bed, according to the 2012 Cisco Connected World Technology Report (CCWTR).

Two out of five said they “would feel anxious, like part of me is missing,” if they couldn’t use their smart phones to stay connected, said the survey conducted by InsightExpress of 1,800 college students and young professionals aged 18 to 30 across 18 countries.

It examined how Generation Y uses the Internet and mobile devices to connect with the world around them and revealed how the need to stay connected drives every facet of their lives: from work to shopping, friendships to family.

Nine of 10 respondents globally will get dressed, brush their teeth, and want to check their smart phones as part of the morning ritual for getting ready for school or work. In India, 96 per cent of those who have smartphones will check for updates as part of the morning routine.

More than one in four Gen Y respondents (29 per cent) says they check their smart phones so constantly that they lose count.

Globally, one in five check their smart phones for email, text, and social media updates at least every 10 minutes.

One-third of respondents check their smart phones at least once every 30 minutes.

Globally, 60 per cent of Gen Yers subconsciously or compulsively checking their smart phones for emails, texts or social media updates. Of those, women are more driven to connect: 85 per cent of women versus 63 per cent of men find themselves often compulsively checking their smartphone for text, emails, social media updates.

Over 40 per cent of respondents would go through a “withdrawal” effect and “would feel anxious, like part of me was missing” if they couldn’t check their smart phones constantly.

In India, 70 per cent of respondents compulsively check their smart phones for updates. Of those, 42 per cent said they would feel anxious if they couldn’t check their smart phones and 71 per cent wish they didn’t feel so compelled, but they like to stay connected, the survey said.