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Updated: January 6, 2014 16:20 IST

GSAT-14 orbit raised for first time

Special Correspondent
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India successfully launched rejuvenated indigenous cryogenic engine- fitted GSLV-D5 carrying communication satellite GSAT-14 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (ISRO) at Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh on Sunday.
PTI India successfully launched rejuvenated indigenous cryogenic engine- fitted GSLV-D5 carrying communication satellite GSAT-14 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (ISRO) at Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh on Sunday.

The first orbit raising operation has been completed on GSAT-14, the communications satellite launched from Sriharikota on Sunday evening, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said.

After its onboard apogee motor was fired for 3,134 seconds - almost an hour - on Monday, the communication satellite currently moves in a temporary elliptical orbit of 35,744 km x 8,966 km.

Over the coming days the satellite will be gradually pushed into a circular orbit. It will be finally parked at its planned slot above 74 degrees East longitude and tested in orbit before it is rendered functional, which normally takes about a month.

The orbit raising and monitoring activities are performed from the ISRO Master Control Facility in Hassan, about 180 km from Bangalore.

GSAT-14 carries 12 transponders for communication and broadcasting uses and is the first domestic satellite to be successfully placed in orbit by the GSLV-MkII launcher.

ISRO on Sunday demonstrated the much needed indigenously built cryogenic engine for the first time on the medium-lift rocket, GSLV-D5.

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