Proteins in frog skins which could be used to treat cancer, diabetes, stroke and transplant patients by regulating the growth of blood vessels have been discovered by Scientists at Queen's University Belfast.

Led by Professor Chris Shaw at Queen's School of Pharmacy, the scientific team has identified two proteins, or ‘peptides', which can be used in a controlled and targeted way to regulate ‘angiogenesis' — the process by which blood vessels grow in the body.

According to a Queen's University press release, the discovery holds the potential to develop new treatments for more than seventy major diseases and conditions that affect more than one billion people worldwide.

The proteins are found in secretions on the skins of the Waxy Monkey Frog and the Giant Firebellied Toad.

Professor Shaw said: “The proteins that we have discovered have the ability to either stimulate or inhibit the growth of blood vessels. By ‘switching off' angiogenesis and inhibiting blood vessel growth, a protein from the Waxy Monkey Frog has the potential to kill cancer tumours. Most cancer tumours can only grow to a certain size before they need blood vessels to grow into the tumour. Stopping the blood vessels from growing will make the tumour less likely to spread and may eventually kill it. This has the potential to transform cancer from a terminal illness into a chronic condition.

“On the other hand, a protein from the Giant Firebellied Toad has been found to ‘switch on' angiogenesis and stimulate blood vessel growth.

This has the potential to treat an array of diseases and conditions that require blood vessels to repair quickly, such as wound healing, organ transplants, diabetic ulcers, and damage caused by strokes or heart conditions.”