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Updated: March 29, 2010 19:43 IST

Egyptian archeologists unearth 3,500-year-old granite door

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A nearly six-foot-tall slab of pink granite used as a false door in the tomb of User, the chief minister of Queen Hatshepsut. The Egyptian antiquities authority says this 3,500-year-old false door was unearthed from the tomb of the high-ranking Egyptian official near Karnak temple in Luxor. Photo: AP
AP A nearly six-foot-tall slab of pink granite used as a false door in the tomb of User, the chief minister of Queen Hatshepsut. The Egyptian antiquities authority says this 3,500-year-old false door was unearthed from the tomb of the high-ranking Egyptian official near Karnak temple in Luxor. Photo: AP

Archeologists have discovered a 3,500-year-old, engraved, red granite door in the southern Egyptian city of Luxor, Egypt's ministry of culture announced Monday.

The massive door, engraved with religious texts in hieroglyphics, initially sealed the tomb of the royal adviser User and his wife Toy, Mansour Boraik, the head of the Egyptian excavation team said in a statement.

Though during his life User was an important adviser to Queen Hatshepsut, the door was taken from his tomb and used as part of a wall in front of the famous Karnak temple during the Roman period, more than 1,000 years after his death, Mr. Boraik said.

Historians generally regard Hatshepsut as among the most successful of ancient Egypt's pharaohs. Egypt was at peace for most of her 22-year reign, allowing her to build trade networks that fed government coffers and funded the construction of monuments and buildings that tourists still flock to see.

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