Archaeologists have discovered a 4600-year-old mysterious step pyramid in Egypt, which was built at least a few decades before the Great Pyramid of Giza.

Scientists are unsure as to why this pyramid was built and speculate it could have been a symbol of the king’s power.

Working near the ancient settlement of Edfu, in southern Egypt, archaeologists unearthed the step pyramid that predates the Great Pyramid of Giza by at least a few decades.

The pyramid, which was once 13 meters in height, is one of seven so-called “provincial” pyramids built by either the pharaoh Huni (2635—2610 BC) or Snefru (2610—2590 BC).

The step pyramid’s stone blocks were pillaged over time, and the monument was exposed to weathering, so it is only about 5 metre tall now, ‘LiveScience’ reported.

The provincial pyramids are scattered throughout central and southern Egypt and are located near major settlements.

They have no internal chambers and were not intended for burial purposes.

Six of the seven pyramids have almost identical dimensions, including the newly uncovered one at Edfu.

The purpose of these seven pyramids remains a mystery, the report said.

“The similarities from one pyramid to the other are really amazing, and there is definitely a common plan,” said Gregory Marouard, a research associate at the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute who led the work.