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Updated: December 22, 2009 14:51 IST

Single dose of H1N1 vaccine enough to protect infants, kids

ANI
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A child wearing mask to protect herself from the H1N1 diesease. File Photo: Sampath Kumar G.P.
THE HINDU A child wearing mask to protect herself from the H1N1 diesease. File Photo: Sampath Kumar G.P.

Infants and children can be protected from H1N1 virus with just one dose of vaccine, a new study claims.

As part of the research, Terry Nolan, from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues examined the effectiveness of two doses of a 2009 influenza A(H1N1) vaccine in 370 healthy infants and children.

The kids were aged between six-months to less than 9 years and were living in Australia.

They were divided into groups before they received a two-injection regimen in a gap of 21 days.

The vaccine dose was limited to either 15-micrograms or 30-micrograms.

In the end, the experts noted that every child had achieved an antibody level considered high enough to protect against the H1N1 virus.

The study stated: “Following the first dose of vaccine, antibody titers of 1:40 or greater were observed in 161 of 174 infants and children in the 15-microgram group (92.5 percent) and in 168 of 172 infants and children in the 30 microgram group (97.7 percent). All participants demonstrated antibody titres of 1:40 or greater after the second vaccine dose.

Children attending schools have been fragile to 2009 influenza A(H1N1) infection in many countries.

The findings suggest that a single dose 15-microgram dose vaccine regimen may be effective and well tolerated in children, and may have positive implications for disease protection and reduced transmission of pandemic H1N1 in the wider population. The study will appear in the January 6 print edition of the journal JAMA.

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