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Updated: December 9, 2009 16:55 IST

Drinking grape juice ‘can reduce or reverse memory loss’

PTI
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Antioxidant-rich foods as well as drinks may help preserve brain function and slow or reverse memory decline.
THE HINDU Antioxidant-rich foods as well as drinks may help preserve brain function and slow or reverse memory decline.

Grape juice, known as the “nectar of the Gods” is blessed with a range of health benefits. Now, added one more to the long list - drinking the beverage can reduce or even reverse memory loss, says a new study.

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have based their findings on an analysis of an experiment, involving some 12 people, aged above 70, with early memory loss.

The subjects were split into two groups, with one drinking pure 100 per cent Concord juice from grapes grown in the Concord region of Massachusetts, and the other a placebo.

Both groups were given regular memory tests over three months.

The researchers found the results of those who drank the grape juice showed an improvement the longer the trial went on, the ‘Daily Mail’ reported.

“Following the treatment, those drinking Concord grape juice demonstrated a significant improvement in list learning.

And trends suggested improved short-term memory retention and spatial, non-verbal memory.

“The results involving Concord grape juice are very encouraging and certainly warrant an additional study. A simple, easy-to-incorporate dietary intervention that could improve or protect memory function, such as drinking Concord grape juice, may be beneficial for the ageing population,” Dr. Robert Krikorian, who led the study, said.

According to the researchers, antioxidants in the skin and juice of the fruit are behind the results, and the study adds weight to the theory that antioxidant-rich foods as well as drinks may help preserve brain function and slow or reverse memory decline.

In 2006 research in the US found that drinking fruit and vegetable juices frequently could significantly cut the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. The large-scale study at Vanderbilt University followed almost 2,000 people for up to ten years.



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