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Updated: October 26, 2012 17:09 IST

Dengue: The virus, the mosquito, the disease

Ramya Kannan
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Source: WHO, Dr. Janani Shankar, senior consultant paediatrician, CHILDS Trust Hospital. Compiled by: Ramya Kannan; Graphic: J.A. Premkumar
The Hindu Source: WHO, Dr. Janani Shankar, senior consultant paediatrician, CHILDS Trust Hospital. Compiled by: Ramya Kannan; Graphic: J.A. Premkumar

In the recent history of Tamil Nadu's epidemics, the most virulent dengue epidemic has swept the state this year. Even as early as one month ago, Tamil Nadu had the highest number of dengue cases, exceeding 5000, and the highest number of deaths in the country at 39. Not that the epidemic has died down since. On the contrary, everyday, reports are coming in of deaths due to dengue, though authorities have claimed that in most instances, other causes for mortality.

While a large measure of prevention rests in the hand of the community, as the mosquitoes breed in clean water collected in domestic and peri domestic areas, health authorities have got into the act, spreading awareness about the need to empty such water containers regularly and clean them periodically to prevent further breeding of mosquitoes.

A few key facts about Dengue can be accessed here.

More In: Health | Sci-Tech | Chennai | News

They can't enlighten a lay man on health and disease. So they are confusing him. Life acts and behaves as single entity responding to challanges thrown by medical misadventurism, mainly the blatant use of antipyratics, antiinflammatories and pain releiving drugs which act against nature's innate wisdom of autochecks and balances. Strange that everyone else is being blamed for disease except the medicos.

from:  Bir Singh Yadav
Posted on: Oct 27, 2012 at 09:51 IST
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