Today's Paper Archive Classifieds Subscriptions RSS Feeds Site Map ePaper Mobile Apps Social
SEARCH

Opinion » Comment

Updated: December 4, 2010 01:50 IST

Vietnam's planned sale of tiger paste protested

AP
Share  ·   Comment   ·   print   ·  
A Sumatran Tiger is seen in Dublin Zoo. Photo: AP
AP A Sumatran Tiger is seen in Dublin Zoo. Photo: AP

A local conservation group in Vietnam voiced its opposition on November 3 to the planned sale of tiger paste by Vietnamese authorities, amid warnings by the international community that the animal's survival is in serious jeopardy.

Officials in Vietnam's northern Thanh Hoa province agreed last month to organise a public auction of six pounds (2.8 kg) of tiger paste seized from traffickers. An auction date has not been set.

Vietnam bans the hunting or trade of wild animals and their products, but the Ministry of Agriculture has issued a directive allowing its use in making medicines.

In Vietnam, tiger bones are used to make expensive traditional medicines purported to cure many illnesses. Two pounds (1 kg) of tiger paste could be sold for $10,000 on the black market.

Nguyen Thi Phuong Dung, deputy director of Hanoi-based Education for Nature Vietnam, said Thanh Hoa authorities had used a “loophole” in the law to allow the sale of the tiger paste.

“The auctions go against conservation efforts,” she told The Associated Press in a phone interview, adding the move has “helped legitimise the trade of the animal.”

“We had recommended that the paste be destroyed to send a clear message to the public that the authorities do not encourage the consumption of wild animals' products,” she said.

Wildlife experts warned at a summit last month in St. Petersburg, Russia, that wild tigers could become extinct in 12 years if countries where they still roam fail to take quick action to protect their habitats and step up the fight against poaching.

The World Wildlife Fund and other experts say only about 3,200 tigers remain in the wild, a dramatic plunge from an estimated 100,000 a century ago.

The summit approved a wide-ranging programme with the goal of doubling the world's tiger population in the wild by 2022. The programme is backed by the governments of the 13 countries that still have tiger populations, including Vietnam.

Several people have been arrested in the last few months in the communist country for their involvement in the trade of wild tigers.

More In: Comment | Opinion
This article is closed for comments.
Please Email the Editor
More »
The HIndu's in-depth coverage of news and opinion on Aadhar and direct benefit transfers


O
P
E
N

close

Recent Article in Comment

Mobiles revolutionise reading in developing world

Unesco is pointing to a “mobile reading revolution” in developing countries after a year-long study found that adults and children are in... »