The dress, the look of corporate offices and the language — everything is a copy of the western model in Indian business schools (“What they don't teach you at Indian B-schools,” March 7). But that shouldn't surprise us. Our elite education system prepares people to work for the West. A system in which academic achievement means reproducing what one learns, and marks are valued over creative thinking, empathy and love are bound to show some cracks somewhere. The huge disconnect between Bharat and India is just the tip of this cracking iceberg.

Naveen I. Thomas,

Bangalore

In the era of WTO, the B-schools of India should act as innovative think tanks and be seen regularly in the business pages of the media. Sadly, the only time one gets to read about them in newspapers is when a few students are hired at astronomical salaries by MNCs.

Talking of railways, here is a hilarious anomaly about passenger fares. A platform ticket costs Rs. 3. But a suburban train ticket to high-tech city from Osmania University in Hyderabad, covering a distance of 16 km, also costs Rs. 3. Is there any rationale in this? Surely, travel and non-travel can't cost the same? This should be a subject for our B-schools to study. Many similar issues can be debated, if only the B-schools care to be Indian.

S. Ganesan,

Secunderabad

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