Support to India’s rightful claim to a permanent seat in the UN Security Council is what Indian lawmakers expect from the US during the address of President Barack Obama in Parliament.

The issue has become the talk among Indian lawmakers and leaders with an MP putting it succinctly that “this is my wish list. It would be great if it comes true” on November 8 when Mr. Obama addresses the joint session of Parliament of the world’s largest democracy.

Another member, AIADMK leader in the Rajya Sabha V. Maitreyan says any U.S. commitment to India on its permanent seat in the Security Council is highly welcome.

“We expect the U.S. President to be forthright in condemning cross-border terrorism,” says Mr. Maitreyan.

His view was shared by former Union minister and Congress leader Shakeel Ahmed.

Ahmed hopes the mutual understanding between the two countries and the resolve to fight against terrorism will be strengthened with Mr. Obama’s speech in Parliament and visit to the country.

“We will expect the US President to support India’s cause for a permanent seat in the Security Council,” he says.

Rajya Sabha MP Abhishek Singhvi, however, sounds a note of caution saying, “It is important not to raise expectations beyond reality and equally to work solidly for concrete results.”

According to the Congress MP, the U.S. has to become an ally and supporter of New Delhi but on India’s independent and non-alignment terms.

He wants civil nuclear cooperation and commerce to be given huge impetus to bridge India’s power deficit.

According to Samajwadi Party General Secretary Mohan Singh, the U.S. should address the security concerns of India during Obama’s address as Pakistan and China were “encircling” the sub-continent.

The Indian IT industry was being harassed in the U.S. by imposition of heavy taxes and wanted Mr. Obama to address the issue, he says.

Mr. Singh says the two countries should play an important role in spreading democracy in the world.

“U.S. Constitution significantly influenced Indian Constitution in the beginning stage of the Republic,” according to another MP.

BJP MP Prakash Javadekar says his party valued the friendship and ties with the US and “we hope he also reciprocates”.

He hopes that Mr. Obama will take a “proper view” of India-China-Pak dynamics. The U.S. President, he says, should address India’s concerns on the issue of fight against terrorism as US aid to Pakistan is being “misused” by the neighbouring country.

The Lok Sabha Secretariat is also contemplating a series of lectures on the Lok Sabha Television before Mr. Obama’s visit, by eminent jurists like Fali Nariman on the evolving relations between the two countries.

Meanwhile, renovation work in Parliament House complex is almost over and the Lok Sabha Secretariat is awaiting confirmation from the Ministry of External Affairs to enable it to print invitation for the high-profile visit.

Additional manpower has been deployed to repair circular road, lighting and activate fountains reaching to the historic Central Hall.

It was the Central Hall where the British handed over power to India in 1947. It was also the platform for addresses by several leaders, including former U.S. President Bill Clinton who visited India in 2000.

An official said that the U.S. security personnel reviewed the arrangements with Parliament Security on Thursday.

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