With rainfall predicted to continue through the week and the ground already saturated, Britain's Environment Agency said there was a risk of flooding across the country, especially southern England.

Thousands of homes along Britain’s River Thames are at risk of flooding, the Environment Agency warned on Monday, as the country continued to suffer the effects of the wettest January since 1766.

The agency issued 14 severe flood warnings for Surrey, where around 2,500 homes are at risk, and Oxfordshire, to the west of the capital.

Another two severe flood warnings were issued for the south—western Somerset Levels, where some areas have been under water for a month.

With rainfall predicted to continue through the week and the ground already saturated, the Environment Agency said there was a risk of flooding across the country, but especially in southern England.

Water levels along the River Severn and Dorset Stour were also expected to continue rising.

The news comes after Britain’s armed forces were deployed on Sunday to build sandbag defences in Somerset.

Around 600 homes have been flooded over the past week, and hundreds of people have been evacuated.

Transport networks also suffered severe disruptions, with parts of the south—west at times unreachable by train.

An 80—metre stretch of the seawall supporting a rail track was last week washed away in the Dorset town of Dawlish, while parts of Somerset’s train network were also submerged in water.

More In: World | International | News