Detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi filed a lawsuit against Myanmar's junta at the Supreme Court on Tuesday for dissolving her party ahead of widely criticised elections, said her lawyer.

Ms. Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) has been forcibly abolished for boycotting the November 7 vote, which activists and the West have condemned as a charade aimed at putting a civilian face on military rule.

The lawsuit aims to reverse the dissolution.

The NLD won a landslide election victory in 1990 but was never allowed to take office. Ms. Suu Kyi has spent most of the past 20 years in detention and is currently under house arrest.

In May, the Supreme Court threw out a suit filed by Ms. Suu Kyi aimed at preventing her party's dissolution.

Asked why the NLD is submitting yet another case with the court, Ms. Suu Kyi's lawyer told reporters: “We are continuing because we have not given up. If we give up we have nothing left to do.”

The New Light of Myanmar newspaper, a junta mouthpiece, recently warned an unnamed party — thought to be the NLD — to drop protests against its abolition, and threatened jail for anyone impeding the upcoming vote.

The party decided to boycott the election in response to rules barring serving prisoners — such as Ms. Suu Kyi — from participating.

The Nobel Peace laureate's current term of house arrest is due to end on November 13, just days after the election.

Critics say the Myanmar junta is taking no chances for the upcoming poll. One quarter of the seats in parliament are reserved for the military, while the junta's proxy parties are seen as having a major advantage in the contest for the remaining seats.

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