The fight against Somali pirates has been so effective that they haven’t been able to mount a successful hijacking in nearly a year, the chair of the global group trying to combat the pirates has said.

U.S. diplomat Donna Leigh Hopkins credits the combined efforts of international naval forces and stepped-up security on ships including the use of armed guards. But there are also other factors, including the jailing of some 1,140 Somali pirate in 21 countries “which started deglamorising piracy”, she said on Thursday.

Somali pirates hijacked 46 ships in 2009, 47 in 2010, but only 25 in 2011, an indication that new on-board defences were working.

In 2012, there were just 75 attacks reported off Somalia and in the Gulf of Aden — down from 237 attacks in 2011 — and only 14 ships were hijacked, according to the International Maritime Bureau.

“Pirate attacks are down by at least 75 per cent,” Ms. Hopkins said in an interview with The Associated Press.

“There are still pirate attacks being attempted but there has not been a successful hijacking since May 2012,” she said.

“May 12 will be the one year anniversary of no successful hijacking off the coast of Somalia.”

Combating the pirates was discussed at a meeting at the U.N. on Wednesday of the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia which includes over 85 countries as well as international organisations and private sector representatives.

Ms. Hopkins, the group’s chair, and Danish Ambassador Thomas Winkler, who chairs its legal committee, stressed that there’s no room for complacency, citing safe havens for pirates on the northern Somali coast and ransoms in the millions of dollars to release hijacked ships and crews that continue to attract young men to piracy.

The last successful hijacking on May 12, 2012 was of the MV Smyrni, a Greek-registered oil tanker less than two years old loaded with crude worth tens of millions of dollars that was released after 11 months of negotiations and payment of “a record-breaking ransom nearing $15 million”, Ms. Hopkins said.

More In: International | News