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Updated: May 9, 2012 00:11 IST

Centre for Tagore studies in Edinburgh

Hasan Suroor
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BEYOND WORDS: In this rare photograph from The Hindu’s archives, Helen Keller, the blind American author and labour rights activist, greets Rabindranath Tagore at a meeting in New York in 1930. Tuesday, May 8, 2012, marked the culmination of the year-long 150th birth anniversary celebrations of Gurudev.
BEYOND WORDS: In this rare photograph from The Hindu’s archives, Helen Keller, the blind American author and labour rights activist, greets Rabindranath Tagore at a meeting in New York in 1930. Tuesday, May 8, 2012, marked the culmination of the year-long 150th birth anniversary celebrations of Gurudev.

A major university Centre dedicated to the life and works of Rabindranath Tagore has opened in Edinburgh, Scotland, to mark the Nobel Laureate’s 150th birth anniversary.

Professor Indra Nath Choudhuri, Academic Director of the Indira Gandhi Institute, will be Scotland’s first Chair in Tagore Studies.

The Scottish Centre for Tagore Studies (ScoTs) at Edinburgh Napier University’s Institute of Creative Industries, which has the second largest Indian student population of any Scottish university, will “promote Indian culture, education, philosophy, art and literature by highlighting Tagore’s legacy’’.

The University said Tagore had “strong links’’ with Scotland, mainly through his friendship with Sir Patrick Geddes, who designed Visva-Bharati at Santiniketan.

“ScoTs will celebrate the life, teaching and vision of Rabrindranath Tagore, whose spirit continues to inspire,’’ said Dr. Bashabi Fraser, Lecturer in Literature and Creative Writing at the University.

She said the Centre was ideally placed to promote cultural connections between Scotland and India.

“By working alongside other European organisations and cultural bodies we’ll be able to spread Tagore’s influence and attract research interest from far and wide,” Dr. Fraser said.

Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs in the Scottish Government, described Tagore as India’s “greatest artist, musician and poet’’.

“He had many close ties to Scotland. ScoTs will celebrate these connections and Tagore’s legacy, deepening the relationship between our two countries. I am delighted that the centre is being launched in this, our Year of Creative Scotland,” she said.

The Centre has been set up under an agreement with the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR), which is funding two PhD fellowships in Tagore studies.

will bring Professor Indra Nath Choudhuri, Academic Director of the Indira Gandhi Institute, to the University as Scotland’s first Chair in Tagore Studies.

The ICCR is also funding two PhD fellowships dedicated to researching the works of the influential author. (ends)

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Helen Kelar was not only blind; but Deaf Mute also due to these 3 handicaps she was totally cut off with world.What is beard she has no idea only touch is the solution.When she came to India in 1955 she was in Mumbai than Bombay describtion no meaning without touching & experiment herself. She wants to know about the what is saree &how indian women wear 6yards saree. that time our minister of Bombay Shree Shantilal Shah's daughter showed the long saree than she asked she wants to wear herself & S Shah's daughter help her to wear saree,here we all have to understand her eagerness to learn, expirense. This is the story before my marrage told by my husband who was himself blind since when he was 12 years old & he was one of the member of the commitee who invited H K in India.I have H K's saree clad photo

from:  Mrs. Madhavi Rajendra Vyas.
Posted on: May 14, 2012 at 21:50 IST

Wonderful to see this rare picture. Thank you for bringing it out of the archives for a worldwide audience. I congratulate the University of Scotland and ICCR for the initiative. The setting of such a centre is commendable.

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from:  Madhulika Gupta
Posted on: May 14, 2012 at 12:01 IST

Thank you, thank you for this rare picture. I am sure many a reader would cut this out and cherish it. The media are now occupied often by visuals of people in public life appearing in court or being led away to prisons. It reminds one of the scriptural warning: “Where there is no vision, the people perish.”

from:  P. Zachariah
Posted on: May 9, 2012 at 11:20 IST
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