The early dilly-dallying notwithstanding, Delhi has made remarkable progress of late and has the potential to deliver the best ever Commonwealth Games next year, according to key CGF Coordination Committee (CoCom) member Perry Crosswhite.

Mr. Crosswhite was part of the Commonwealth Games Federation’s CoCom which recently took stock of Delhi’s progress and the CEO of the Australian Commonwealth Games Association sounded thoroughly impressed.

“The jury is still out but given the rapid progress that the organisers are making, the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi have the potential to be the best Games ever,” he said.

Crosswhite said Delhi was slow to react but once they realised that time was of essence, significant progress was made in very little time.

“We have had concerns on occasions this year in regards to the organising committee’s ability to meet deadlines and requirements. However as 2009 draws to a close I am buoyed by the progress shown in the last couple of months.

“After meeting with the CGF in October, organisers have appointed a number of international experts including village operations expert John Lade, event manager Peter Stewart and technology specialist Brian Norse. They all have significant experience in major games such as the Sydney Olympics and Melbourne Commonwealth Games,” Mr. Crosswhite was quoted as saying by ‘The Daily Telegraph’

The Organising Committee were lax in their approach to the Games’ preparation which drew flak from CGF top brass but once the Government of India took charge, progress has been fast-tracked.

Mr. Crosswhite said the government’s involvement augured well for the Games.

“It’s also pleasing to see that the Indian government has become more involved. They fully understand that the Games need to be a success for their country, their people and their standing on the international stage,” he said.

After the three-day stock-taking, CoCom chairman Austin Sealy also patted the organisers for pulling up their socks.

“There has been noticeable progress over the last two months. However, with only nine months remaining, the intensity must continue,” Mr. Sealy said.

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