Software will send real-time information by SMS and email to parents about the child’s condition

What happens if a child falls ill or sustains an accidental injury in school? While a health facility with qualified medical professional is necessary for managing common illnesses/emergencies among school children, informing the parents on time is equally important.

Here is a system that does both and also monitors each student’s growth and health condition.

Don Bosco, Egmore, in association with MedSense School Health Stations has launched a School Health and Emergency Care System. The school has a health station with a qualified nurse. A bicycle school ambulance for the nurse has also been launched.

Children spend at least six to eight hours in school every day, and stand a high chance of sustaining accidental injuries or falling ill at school, said Madhu Purushothaman, paediatrician and advisor, MedSense School Health Stations.

“In Western countries, every school is mandated by law to have school nurses. In developing countries, the idea is yet to catch up. We have developed protocols on what the nurse should do if a child has injuries or difficulty in breathing or fever,” said Madhu Purushothaman, paediatrician and advisor, MedSense School Health Stations, at the launch of the programme on Wednesday.

A software programme enables the nurse to send real-time information — by SMS and email — to parents about the child’s condition and details of the first-aid given. It also facilitates electronic growth monitoring of students. Other features include giving nutritional advice to parents based on the child’s growth metrics, age and school timings, and tracking vaccination and de-worming status. Students will also be screened for iron deficiency, anaemia, and vision and dental problems.

Fr. John Alexander, rector of the school, said the system had been in place for almost a year now. The health had recorded 4,335 student visits, of which 2,543 have been for injuries.

J. Radhakrishnan, health secretary, stressed the need for inculcating health-seeking behaviour in children.

T.K. Parthasarathy, former vice-chancellor of Sri Ramachandra Medical College and University, and G.S.K. Velu, managing director of Trivitron Healthcare Group, were present.

More In: Chennai | Society