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Updated: October 15, 2012 11:17 IST

Lower socio-economic groups yet to respond positively

Tanu Kulkarni
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We are open to ideas to make this initiative successful, says BBMP official. Photo: K.Gopinathan
We are open to ideas to make this initiative successful, says BBMP official. Photo: K.Gopinathan

Pockets with residents belonging to lower socio-economic groups need special awareness programmes

The Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike’s (BBMP) varied awareness programmes on segregation of waste at source do not seem to have percolated down to the last man, especially the lower socio-economic groups. This is evident as the BBMP has achieved just 34 per cent success in garbage segregation.

Hanumanthiah Sabanna (35), a construction labourer who lives near Kengeri, leaves home every day at 6 a.m. for work. He said that segregation was the least of his priorities. In fact, he was unaware of the BBMP’s initiative. When pressed further, he said, “When I leave home, I take a packet of waste and dump it at the end of my street. I cannot wait for the pourakarmikas to come and collect garbage.”

Puttaswami Kenchiah (40), an electrician who lives in Kamakshipalya, said that garbage collection does not happen at his doorstep. “I have to go to the end of the road and dump the waste in a plastic cover. However, now we are being asked to desist from using plastic covers. How else are we supposed to dispose of garbage?” he asked.

Some residents even questioned the civic body’s advice to residents to wash milk packets and packets that other commodities come in. “We do not have enough water to drink. How can we waste water by cleaning milk packets?” lamented an autorickshaw driver who lives near Magadi Road.

A pourakarmika, who lives in Kamakshipalya, admitted that even she does not follow segregation. One of her neighbours admitted that since the autorickshaw drivers, who collect waste, refuse to collect mixed waste, the pourakarmikas were making “special” arrangements to accept it from them.

Most residents that The Hindu spoke to were aware of only two types of waste — dry and wet waste. They said that they had not heard of the other classifications. One of the truck drivers, who collects waste near Kamakshipalya, said that despite repeated requests, residents seemed indifferent to the new rule.

“Some of them have genuine reasons, others are just stubborn. Once the BBMP starts imposing a fine on defaulters, things may change,” he said.

He that said he has not received any sanitary waste ever since segregation was made mandatory. He said that pockets with residents belonging to lower socio-economic groups need special awareness programmes.

Acknowledging the problems and hurdles involved, K. Chandrashekar, Additional Commissioner (west zone), said that he would notify places that would need special attention. He added, “We are open to ideas and inputs from the citizens to make this initiative successful.”

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