The session on ‘study skills’ under the ‘Enhancing Academic Performance’ module at Carmel Matriculation School dwelt on the ‘why’, ‘where’ and ‘how’ to study .

If you were to find the way to the market, what would you prefer – verbal directions or a map?

Your choice determines the way you process, remember and reproduce what you study. While some students learn and remember best by being attentive in class, others need to put things in writing. The ‘Newspaper in Education’ (NIE) programme of The Hindu that uses the newspaper as an educational tool is back in classrooms. The session on ‘study skills’ under the ‘Enhancing Academic Performance’ module at Carmel Matriculation School dwelt on the ‘why’, ‘where’ and ‘how’ to study .

Students of class IX were clear about the ‘why’ of studying attributing it to high scores, thirst for knowledge, job prospects and high standing in society. Yet not everyone who studies well finds their efforts translating into good marks. To make the marks match the efforts, it is essential to identify where one lags behind, resource person Chandra told students.

An ideal place for study is essentially one with minimum distractions, agreed students. A comfortable pot with plenty of light where one can tune out sounds of the calling bell, telephone and television is conducive for studying. “Don’t sit on the bed and study,” warned Ms. Chandra. “It is a sure way to find yourself fast asleep!”

A survey of study techniques of the class found they were varied – some students believed listening in class was half the battle won, others felt note-taking was a sure-fire way to success. While group studies was the modus operandi for mathematics and science, students felt subjects heavily banking on theory were suited for solo learning.

There maybe no single perfect study method- it is all about identifying what works for an individual and sticking to it.

Employing mnemonics or abbreviations for complex concepts, alternating practical subjects like science and maths with theory-based language and social studies can help, suggested Ms. Chandra. And when you find your mind wandering, nudge yourself back to the books with ‘Be here now!’