Krishna phase-III, Godavari projects likely to be completed by 2015, could hold the key. Even as there are worries about the civic infra gaps in the twin cities, a refreshing assurance is coming from the Water Board to meet the ever growing demand for potable water.

For a capital which is going to be shared by two States in a couple of months from now, supplying adequate potable water to the citizens is a huge challenge.

Over the years there has been perpetual mismatch between demand and supply despite the best efforts of the Hyderabad Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board (HMWSSB).

Even as there are worries about the civic infra gaps in the twin cities, a refreshing assurance is coming from the Water Board to meet the ever growing demand for potable water.

It claims that if the plans really fructify, there will be an end to the thirst of the capital by December this year.

HMWSSB officials, declining to be identified, informed that the Krishna phase three and Godavari projects are expected to be completed by the year-end. Once these two projects are completed, the board is expected to receive another 90 million gallons per day (MGD) and 172 MGD, which will help meet the current deficit of 150 MGD.

As of now, the city receives 340 MGD of water everyday, which are drawn from the Osmansagar and Himayatsagar (40 MGD) lakes, Krishna phase 1 and 2 (180 MGD), and Manjeera phase 1 to 4 projects (120 MGD). However, the actual demand is 490 MGD.

The senior officials informed that though the completion of the projects will bring in surplus water, the HMWSSB also has to meet supply demands outside Hyderabad, totalling about 106 MGD.

The Krishna phase three and Godavari projects were taken up at an estimated cost of Rs.1,670 crore and Rs.3,750 crore, respectively.

70 p.c. complete

Works on the former began early last year, while in the latter, it was started more than three years ago and almost 70 per cent of works have been completed. A senior official informed that by June-end , HMWSSB will be able to draw 50 per cent (45 MGD) of water from the Krishna phase 3 project.

A World Bank project to lay pipelines in the areas of Malkajgiri is yet to take off, as the model code of conduct is in force now.

“Once that project is completed, citizens staying in the Malkajgiri areas will not face water problems,” said the official.

While water supply may finally be ample, the question of how sewerage is going to be treated is another issue the water board faces. Most household sewers are either linked to storm water drains or let out into the existing water bodies nearby.

Flow is perennial in storm water drains, which are supposed to be dry except during the rains, indicating the illegal link of sewers because of which excess rainwater does not drain away easily, pointed out a senior municipal official.

Officials said that a master plan for suburbs or for the core city is delayed due to lack of funds, as precedence is given to sudden exigencies or water supply works.

“The government should help HMWSSB to build a proper underground sewerage system for better hygiene and sanitation,” added an official.