Badarpur which the BJP regained after a hiatus of over six decades in the Assembly elections last year saw party candidate Ramvir Singh Bidhuri win over the Congress by a margin of over 13,000 votes.

Voting preferences vary depending on the nature of elections and apparently so do door-to-door visits from candidates contesting these elections. The villagers in South Delhi’s Badarpur say “nobody came asking for votes this time around” compared to the days leading up to the 2013 Delhi Assembly Elections.

Seated on concrete steps with her neighbours on Thursday morning was 45-year-old Sheela Devi, resident of Tajpur village, who recollected seeing Bharatiya Janata Party’s South Delhi candidate Ramesh Bidhuri on a “road show” and the Congress’ Ramesh Kumar driving past on a few occasions. “But nobody came knocking on doors like they did last year,” she said.

Badarpur which the BJP regained after a hiatus of over six decades in the Assembly elections last year saw party candidate Ramvir Singh Bidhuri win over the Congress by a margin of over 13,000 votes. The Aam Aadmi Party that was kick-starting its innings in the Capital then came in third. Yet, many voters on Thursday admitted about not knowing the Aam Aadmi Party candidate from South Delhi.

“The crowds at the polling stations appear more or less the same as last year’s elections but very few people came seeking votes at people’s homes,” said Gaurav Kumar, who runs a restaurant in Molarband village. His area neighbour, Meenakshi, who had accompanied her sister to the polling station, said that the mood was very subdued. “Only rallies and road shows took place this time,” said the 17-year-old.

A curious comment came from Mohan Baba Nagar resident Rakesh Ojha who claimed that Congress workers told people in his neighbourhood to vote for the ‘jhaadu’ (broom), the AAP’s election symbol. “Looks like the BJP will win the elections but with a lower margin,” he said.

Molarband residents Ashok Pathak and wife Beena also claim to not have seen any candidates campaigning. “Some jhaadu log came and gave us pamphlets this time,” said the 43-year-old. “I voted for change,” he said.

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