Experienced as well as upcoming artists from across the country have presented figurative and landscape work for a month-long exhibition which opens at Art Perspective in Lado Sarai in New Delhi this Thursday.

Experienced as well as upcoming artists from across the country have presented figurative and landscape work for a month-long exhibition which opens at Art Perspective in Lado Sarai here this Thursday.

Themeless

Titled “Verve”, the exhibition does not have any theme. The newly-opened gallery, which seeks to promote tribal art and folk art, has given artists -- Anurag Mehta, Amit Kapoor, Biju Mathew, Jiaur Rahman, Jiban Barman, R.D. Roy, Ramesh Jhawar, Raktim Chatterjee, Rajesh Sawant, Sanjay Kamble, Sikander Singh, Sachin Naik, Vinod More, Vikrant Shitole, Vinayak Deshmukh and others – a bigger platform to express their creative thoughts on canvas.

The gallery decided to host the exhibition at this time of the year because water colour has a connection with monsoon.

According to spokesperson of the gallery, transparency and delicacy of this medium imparts a fresh appeal to a work of art every time the discerning viewer looks at it.

In Anjani Reddy’s work, agrarian images of a traditional Indian village come to life in fine detail. “Her female forms are a reminder of the simplicity and beauty that we have lost, so mired are we in the complexities of everyday life. A similar spiritual approach can be found Vasudeo Kamath’s portrayal of India’s ancient heritage. He has recreated the magic of dohas, abhangs and Marathi poetry by Kabir, Tulsidas and others in his work and believes that watercolours are the best suited medium to bring out the naivety of those ancient times.”

A statement about the contemporary times has been made by Prabal Mallik in his watercolours that feature a series of three cows.

Making a comment on the disparity between the rich and those reeling below the poverty line, he has tried to create an analogy between animal forms and the world at large.

Nasik-born Prafull Sawant has efficaciously used watercolours to portray the ghats of the Ganga river and the landscapes of the temple town which he resides in. The female form resurfaces in Vinod More’s work portraying different emotions and moods of a woman as she reclines against a couch.

The other artists in the show, too, have used the medium in the most evocative way bringing alive the magic of monsoon on their canvas.