With few precious nursery seats for the general candidates, Delhi parents state that though their wards have little chance of making it to these institutions, they "can’t afford to not apply".

Minority schools in the Capital have started their nursery admission process, sounding the bugle for the over 1.50 lakh applicants who are all set to fight it out for a little over one lakh seats available for this academic session.

While the Delhi High Court brought the admission process, which was to begin from January 15, to a grinding halt earlier this week by reserving its verdict on the matter, it allowed some fifty minority schools in the city to frame their own rules and begin the admission process.

With few precious nursery seats for the general candidates, parents state that though their wards have little chance of making it to these institutions, they “can’t afford to not apply”.

“Several good minority schools including St. Columba’s, St. Michael’s, Father Agnel, Mount Carmel and Presentation Convent are much sought after and though they give preference to Christian students, they also take in children from other communities depending upon the seat availability. With value for money education available in these institutions, many parents from the general category are hoping for a seat for their children here,” said D.P. Natrajan from Mayur Vihar who is hoping to secure a seat for his over four-year-old daughter in a good school.

His daughter did not get admission into any of the top 50 schools in the city and is re-applying this year. Most minority schools which take students who are over four years old are then, according to parents, “the only viable option for those who failed to get admission in other schools”.

“All minority schools are following the point system for their admission process and maximum points are being allotted to those from the minority community irrespective of the distance. Points are also being allotted for those staying within 2 km of the school or 8 km (if he or she uses school transport). Points are also being given for siblings,” said Sumit Vohra, who has been advocating parents’ rights.

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