Around 70 per cent of such diseases are reported from low and middle-income countries, while the total burden of such diseases globally stands at 17 per cent.

Rains in Delhi come with the threat of rise in the number of malaria and dengue cases.

“Twice each year, several persons in the city get affected by these vector-borne diseases — malaria, dengue and Japanese Encephalitis, among others. The diseases cause serious illness and even casualties,” said Delhi Medical Association member Anil Bansal.

In a document released earlier this week, the World Health Organisation (WHO) maintained that vector-borne diseases could be eradicated through preventive measures and more financial commitment for campaigns against the diseases.

WHO representative to India Nata Menabde said: “Vector-borne diseases are transmitted by mosquitoes, sand flies and fleas. There is a need to strengthen the overall healthcare system in the country to prevent these diseases and more financial commitment to contain them. In this regard, we cannot over emphasise the importance of primary healthcare. People have to be empowered with awareness to ensure that these diseases are prevented.”

Around 70 per cent of such diseases are reported from low and middle-income countries, while the total burden of such diseases globally stands at 17 per cent.

Vectors are organisms that transmit pathogens and parasites from one infected person or animal to another, causing serious diseases.

A senior Delhi Health Ministry official said: “Prevention of vector-borne diseases is not just the job of government departments, even people have to join hands to ensure that breeding of vectors is not allowed.”

“Each year, the State Health Department spends a large amount of money and resources on creating awareness, ensuring door-to-door checking of vector breeding and informing residents on what to do in case symptoms are detected. People, too, have to co-operate by keeping high hygiene standards, or else we will have to continue to bear the assault of vector-borne diseases,” he added.

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