Meet Ace lensman Manoj Paramahamsa, a cinematographer whose work in the past few years has done much of the speaking.

He left audiences awe- struck with his splendid visuals in “Eeram,” and with his second release “Vinnaithandi Varuvaya” he has redefined the meaning of camera work in Tamil cinema. Critics describe him as more of an artist. He brought out the true beauty of the temple town Srirangam in his debut film “Eeram” and in VTV he showed us Kerala like we never before.

How was your experience shooting for VTV?

“Vinnaithaandi Varuvaayaa” (VTV) was a new experience for several reasons the main being- working with the legend himself. I feel VTV will be a major breakthrough in my career after “Eeram”. There's a lot that I've learnt from this project. Experiments in terms of lighting, camera angles. were always welcomed by the Director. This ultimately gave me the confidence to bring out such an output.

How different was it from “Eeram”?

To start of with both the films are of different genres. “Eeram” being a crime thriller demanded a different style of photography altogether. I had to bring out the eerie effect through my lens. Talking about “VTV”, as it's a love story it required a soft, dreamy, romantic feel. I had to unlearn what I had learnt for “Eeram”.

Are there any memorable moments you can remember shooting for “VTV”?

The most exciting and memorable part was the travel to different new locations. I love travelling and I enjoyed every bit of the production.

How did you find it shooting in the Big Apple?

I love travelling and this is one of my favourite places in the world. Doing something you love in a place where you enjoy doing it is an out of world experience. Guess that explains all.

How was it to work under Gautham Menon?

Fantastic would be an understatement. I am a huge fan of Gautham sir. It was a great privilege working with him. As a person GVM is very calm and composed and a quick decision maker which obviously comes after great thinking. He is open to suggestions from his co-workers, which is a great moral boost for any worker.

On what basis do you select your projects?

I don't have any restrictions on that front. I'm open to all kinds of original concepts. Although, I would prefer to do a Surrealistic film over a commercial film. I've grown up watching a lot of surrealistic films. Surrealism has always fascinated me.

Are you excited about working on Ajith's 50th film?

Of course! I'm actually quite nostalgic. I've worked as an assistant cinematographer in one of his previous films and it was a great experience. I hope to revive the comradeship with Ajith through this film.

Prasanth is a Std XI student of Chettinad Vidyashram

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