Eight artists — both established and emerging — come together to showcase their paintings

After a brief absence from the art scene, The Faraway Tree Gallery returns with an exhibition featuring the works of John Tun Sein, KM Adimoolam, Akkitham Narayanan, RB Bhaskaran, Bibekananda Santra, Gurdeep Singh, Hamid Bin Amar and Pradeep Puthoor as part of Art Chennai. The untitled exhibition displays a small but very interesting selection of works from both established and emerging artists.

John Tun Sein's large amber abstract is hung alongside two oil pastel miniatures, revealing two vastly differing facets of the gentle, soft-spoken artist. The abstract is large, and abstract, whereas the other two works are small and more impressionistic, depicting the faint and smudged outlines of figures and trees. “The canvas here is completely spontaneous,” he says, gesturing his abstract. “When I begin, I don't know what the finished product will look like. The journey that takes me is what is important. When it's done, it's done, and I'm ready to move on to the next work.” It's an intriguing work, one that has an allure that can't quite be explained in words. It appears almost divided in half by two shades of orange, separated down the centre by a thick daubs of colour. It conveys a placid, contented kind of energy — sort of like him.

Exploring Nature

KM Adimoolam's work is similarly spontaneous, exploring Nature through abstraction on a canvas that works through the artist's vision of the natural world entirely through colour — discovering the “untold truths” through the medium of paint.

Akkitham Narayanan's canvas features triangles, squares and curves, playing with colour and geometry, and shrouding his shapes with soft-focus edges that are subtly offset and slim straight white lines that divide his space into geometric shapes.

RB Bhaskaran's mixed media on paper works with Indian motifs, and there is a tribal dimension to his work, that is generously scattered with dots, whilst Hamid Bin Amar's impasto oils fuse colour and texture, creating a thick myriad of shades.

(The exhibition is on at The Faraway Tree until April 7)

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