Sahara One’s “Aakhir Bahu Bhi Toh Beti Hee Hai” focuses on the evolving relationships between mother-in-law and daughter-in-law

Saas-bahu’s bickering continues to fascinate television channels. Recently, Sahara One, which has been lying low for some time, launched a new series Aakhir Bahu Bhi Toh Beti Hee Hai. The title sounds similar to Kyunki Saas Bhi Kabhi Bahu Thi and the content also seems to be on the same lines. The series captures the changing relationship between mothers-in-law and daughters-in-law, who are the mainstay of Indian family.

Prachee Pathak, who is playing the role of saas (mother-in-law) named Naulakha Devi, says, “It’s the story of a family where bahus and betis are treated differently. I am playing a mother-in-law who is traditional and observes all the rituals. She believes that she must be very strict with the bahus and whatever her mother-in-law expected of her should be taught to her bahus as well.”

A daughter leaves her parents’ house with dreams and expectations of being treated like a daughter in her in-laws house. However, often these dreams are shattered due to traditional norms.

Payal Rajput is playing one such bahu Siya, who is a sweet, happy and a friendly girl. She believes in family values and respects her elders but is not orthodox. Speaking about her character Payal, says, “I represent a modern young woman, who is fearless, vibrant and self respecting and she believes that her sasural is not going to be any different from her mayka.

As to why the problem of acceptability and clashes arise between the saas and bahu, Prachee says, “Daughter-in-law comes to the new house leaving all her loved-ones behind. She gives priority to a new man, she is ready to accept a new house as her own despite all those lists of do’s and don’ts and in such circumstances she expects only a little love and respect and on the contrary the mother-in-law doesn’t like any change. She wants to take the tradition as it was earlier followed, forward.”

On why only the relation of saas and bahu remains in focus on television, Prachee, says, “Actually, no other relation has so much generation gap and clash of perception. Bahu thinks that she has left all she had, even her surname, so she thinks that she should be accepted with respect and saas believes that why should she share her own traditional rights with someone who is very young and very new.”