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Updated: July 3, 2013 19:16 IST

Aftermath of Zombie war

DEEPTHA SREEDHAR
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Apocalypse fiction: World War Z by Max Brooks.
Apocalypse fiction: World War Z by Max Brooks.

Blood, gore and pain – a recording of the world post the Zombie war.

Books are of many kinds. Some intrigue us from page one, some build the plot gradually and some others include twists and turns at regular intervals to keep us glued to them.

World War Z belongs to an altogether different category, which is plain and has a not-so engaging description about the aftermath and survival records of a Zombie war.

Plot

The book is an account of the survivors of a Zombie attack which is presented through a series of interviews that the narrator, an agent of the United Nations Postwar Commission, gives.

The story begins in China with a boy who is infected with a deadly, unidentifiable pandemic that fast-spreads across the world. Describing the cause, its effects and probable origin, the narrator takes us along various parts of the world.

The author has dealt in detail with the descriptions of survivors, post-war recovery and the measures adopted by various governments. Many attempts to eradicate the Zombies remain unsuccessful, and years roll by in the mean time. Almost after a decade, the war comes to an end.

However, millions of Zombies have spread and deep-rooted themselves. The book has not clearly explained about the various changes in names and practices that arose post world war.

The epilogue seems unusually long, again packed with boring description of a global scenario post war, where millions of Zombies have inhabited Earth among an almost dead human population.

Pitfalls

The book has an overdose of description and information that is boring. It is dragging in most parts and by the time you complete the book, the initial accounts of survivors at China and Israel are forgotten.

The fact that the narrator has talks about the survival of humanity across major countries of the world, makes it universally appealing. The style of writing leaves room for imagination.

Bottom line — this book is not your cup of tea if you do not like Zombie/apocalypse fiction.

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