Yaaran Di Hatti in Mayur Vihar – Phase 2 is for those with a soft spot for brain curry, writes RAHUL VERMA

Our friend Murali is a great foodie. But he had quite a bad experience the other day. He had gone to one of the restaurants in Pandara Road Market and asked for his favourite — a plate of brain curry. The curry arrived, and he took a mouthful and started feeling queasy. The restaurant very properly didn’t charge him for the dish, but Murali was shattered. Imagine the plight he was in — magaz masala in front of him, and the poor guy couldn’t eat it.

He told me this story, and it upset me so much that I felt I had to eat some brain curry to get back into my usual cheerful frame. So I looked around in my neighbourhood and zeroed in on a new eatery. I liked its name — Yaaran Di Hatti — and was especially moved when I saw a little message on their takeaway menu card, ‘Speciality Magaz’.

Yaaran Di Hatti is in Mayur Vihar Phase 2, behind Virmani Hospital, and rather conveniently between two chemist shops. I went there and had a look, and was impressed by the fact that the place was very clean, with an open and spruced up kitchen. There are a few high tables for people who want to have a quick meal there. And, of course, it’s a takeaway too, and does deliveries in the area. The address is shop no. 6, G.S. Arcade, Local Shopping Centre, Pocket B, Mayur Vihar - Phase 2. The place is open for both lunch and dinner, but is shut on Tuesdays.

I looked at the menu card and was happy to see that it offered three kinds of brain dishes — Amritsari magaz masala, magaz chatkara and handi magaz. I asked for a plate of Amritsari magaz masala (Rs.200 for full, Rs.120 for half), dal makhni (Rs.100), a plate of chicken biryani with gravy (Rs.180), and a butter naan and lachchha paratha (both Rs.20). Then, the day after, I ordered an Afghani chicken (Rs.160 for half) and butter chicken (Rs.220 for half).

I was yearning for some brain curry, and Yaaran’s fare was just what I was looking for. The brain was buttery and soft, and hadn’t been overwhelmed with masalas or chillies. (Some people do that, killing its subtle taste.) It went very well with the parantha, which was very nice indeed. (The naan had become a bit rubbery, as it happens when it goes cold). The dal was excellent — creamy and rich — and the biryani had a nice minty flavour.

The following day’s order wasn’t bad either. The chicken pieces in the butter chicken were nicely succulent, though the gravy was a bit too sweet. The Afghan chicken was delicious; the chicken was soft and juicy, mildly spiced and perfectly cooked.

So Yaaran Di Hatti did not disappoint. My only worry is that restaurants that serve good food don’t seem to thrive in our locality. The Tunday kabab eatery that opened a few months ago has now downed its shutters. But YDH must go on — and for that, brain curry lovers must stand up to be counted.

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