SEARCH

Features » Sunday Magazine

Updated: August 6, 2011 16:29 IST

Sunday Magazine Mail Bag

print   ·   T  T  
Rahul Dravid after hitting a century at the 2,000th test at Lord's.
AFP Rahul Dravid after hitting a century at the 2,000th test at Lord's.

Unique flavour

This refers to the article “Beyond victory and defeat” by Suresh Menon (July 31). There is no gainsaying the fact that Test cricket is the most challenging format of the game and the players who want to excel in it must be talented and persevering. But at the same time, one must not be oblivious of the fact that it's the knowledgeable spectators that have made this version thrive amidst slam-bang formats such as one-dayers and Twenty20s

S. Ramakrishnasayee

Ranipet

Test cricket is real cricket. ODIs and T20s are just frills. But it is sad that India is playing very few Tests in 2011. More ODIs and T20s are in the offing. An ODI or a T20 match is a game of chance. Whereas Test cricket is a game of skill which requires planning. Test cricket will always stand taller than the other versions of the game.

K.Pradeep

Chennai

“Beyond victory and defeat” (July 31) lies the way to wealth and the path to fame.

Jacob Sahayam

Thiruvananthapuram

Just harmless fun

“So what's the fuss all about?” by Vijay Nair (July 24) on the recent controversy of “Delhi Belly” being targeted made interesting reading. It is unfortunate that unnecessary fuss is made about the movie, which only ends up giving it indirect publicity. The movie is a simple story of three bachelors in a dingy room at Delhi facing various problems and ending up solving them, all narrated with a comic touch. Because it had some vulgar slang dialogue, the movie got an “A” Certificate but there is no need for all that controversy as it is otherwise an enjoyable movie.

R. Sekar

Visakhapatnam

Be it Delhi Belly or any other controversial movie, not all the viewers have minds which are sacred enclosures into which nothing can enter without their permission. One wonders why certain producers are intent on making movies which would trigger violence or protests. Movies are, after all, a form of entertainment with family stories, romance, songs and comedy. Or, if they want to send a message it should not be targeted against any particular religion or their followers. There are several movies which make fun of certain groups or customs, but it is all done through songs or comic scenes and the affected parties simply laugh it off.

P.U. Krishanan

Ooty

Notorious

Kalpana Sharma in her article “Insurmountable hurdle” ( July 24 ) hit the nail right on the head when she stated that “Indians are notoriously proficient in bypassing even the best-made laws.” In foreign countries, even if an unfavourable law is passed, it would be obeyed and agitations done to get it scrapped or modified. While in India, for every law, the first thing thought about is how to circumvent it or disobey it. Further, social necessities cannot be enforced by legislation as is evident from the implementation of the PC & PNDT Act and earlier The Child Marriage Prevention Act (popularly known as Sharda Act) when marriages of young girls were performed in French Territories like Yanam , Puducherry etc. What is required is educating especially the rural poor and middle class and the uneducated . We are racing towards a dangerous situation as far as the skewed sex ratio is concerned.

G. Venkata Subba Lakshmi

Visakhapatnam

Ego talk

“My ego and I” (July 24) was a well written article by Vijay Nagaswami. Actually the ego and the “I” are one and the same. One's mind is incessantly looking not only for food for thought; it is looking for food for its identity, its sense of self. This is how the ego comes into existence and continuously re-creates itself! When each thought absorbs one's attention completely, it means that one had identified with the voice in one's head. This is the ego, a mind-made “me”. The ego is not to be rooted out, but it has to be sent back to the place from where it sprouts, that is the heart.

B.R. Kumar

Chennai

RELATED NEWS

Sunday MagazineJune 28, 2012

Amandeep Sandhu, Manjul Bajaj, Manu Joseph and Sonora Jha read from their novels that were shortlisted for The Hindu Prize for Fiction 2013. Ziya Us Salam introduces them and moderates the session. <... »


O
P
E
N

close

Recent Article in Sunday Magazine

Singer Monica Dogra

Notes on fashion

How female artistes are making a statement with their songs as well as style. »