Did you know there are reminders of the freedom struggle may be in a city near you. Yes, a building or landmark that has borne witness to some of the greatest moments in the independence movement. Here are a few …

Sabarmati Ashram was the place Gandhi chose to settle down in, on his return from South Africa and from where he hoped to “carry on the search for Truth and develop Fearlessness”. Located in the Ahmedabad suburb of Sabarmati, this is also the place from where Gandhi embarked on the Dandi Salt March. — one of the landmark events that lay the foundation for the freedom struggle. The ashram is now a national monument.

The Cellular Jail in the Andaman's was built between 1898 and 1906. It is one of the darkest landmarks that serves to remind people of the torture and pain suffered by those who opposed the British Raj was subject to. Now it is a major tourist attraction. Its inmates include Dr. Diwan Singh Kalepani, Maulana Fazl-e-Haq Khairabadi, Yogendra Shukla, Batukeshwar Dutt, Maulana Ahmadullah, Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, V. O. Chidambaram Pillai, Subramaniam Shiva and Jatish Chandra Pal.

The Red Fort, built by Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan and inaugurated in 1647, is now a tourist attraction. It was from here Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, the first prime Minister of India, hoisted the national flag and declared India a free country on August 15, 1947. Ironically, its capture by the British in 1857 saw the end of the three-century long Mughal rule.

Jallianwala Bagh now a public garden in Amritsar in the Punjab, was witness to one of the bloodiest massacres in the history of independence struggle. Infamously referred to as the Jallianwala Bagh massacre, it was where the British opened fired at an unarmed gathering of thousands of men, women and children on April 13, 1919.

The Gateway of India built in 1911 to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to Bombay, ironically was the place from where the last British troops in India — the First Battalion of the Somerset Light Infantry — ceremoniously exited the country by passing through it on February 28, 1948.

Parliament house is another landmark. On April 8, 1929, Bhagat Singh and Batukeshwar Dutt bombed the Central Legislative Assembly, taking place in the Parliament building of today, opposing the Act granting the police more power.

The Aga Khan Palace was built by Sir Sultan Muhammed Shah Aga Khan III, in 1892, near Pune. It is significant because it was where Mahatama Gandhi, his wife Kasturba and his secretary Mahadev Bhai Desai were held under house arrest from August 9, 1942 till May 6, 1944. Now called the Gandhi National Memorial, it also houses the memorials of Kasturba Gandhi and Mahadev Desai both of whom died in captivity.

Belvedere House, Kolkatta, now a national library, housed the former Vice regal Palace for the Viceroy of India or the Governor-general of India until the Government House was constructed.

Rashtrapati Bhavan where the President of India resides is where the Viceroy of India resided until 1950 and was known as the Viceroy House.

The Gateway of India built in 1911 to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to Bombay, ironically was the place from where the last British troops in India — the First Battalion of the Somerset Light Infantry, ceremoniously exited the country by passing through it on February 28, 1948.

The Vellore Fort built by Bomma Reddy Nayak and Thimma Reddy Nayak, chieftains of the Vijayanagara Empire, in the 16th century, was the place where the British stationed their Infantry Military units of the Madras Regiment. It was here that Tippu Sultan's family and the last king of Sri Lanka, Sri Vikrama Rajasinha were held royal prisoners. The fort is remembered as the place where one of the first rebellions against the British rule broke out in 1806 — famously known as the Vellore Mutiny.

Panamaram Fort is a reminder of the Southern province's contribution to the freedom struggle. In October 11, 1802, it witnessed one of the earliest freedom struggles headed by the Pazhassi Raja's followers Thalakkal Chanthu and Edachena Kunkan Nair who captured the fort which was then manned by the infantry units of Bombay.

RELATED NEWS

India — home to the worldAugust 9, 2010