Bojjannakonda stands testimony to the fact that Buddhism flourished in north Andhra between 3rd century BC and 7th century AD.

Located at a distance of 40 km. from Visakhapatnam, Bojjannakonda stands testimony to the fact that Buddhism flourished in north Andhra between 3rd century BC and 7th century AD. It was excavated under the aegis of Alexander Rim in 1906.

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A gold coin belonging to the Samudra Gupta period, copper coins of the Chalukya king, Kubja Vishnu Vardhan, coins of Andhra Satavahanas and pottery were discovered at the site. It shows features the three phases of Buddhism : Hinayana, Mahayana and Vajrayana.

A figure of ‘Kalabhairava' with the head of Lord Ganesha wearing conch shells and the image of a Buddhist monk, ‘Harati' have also been found at the site. A stairway leads to a large double-storied cave on the hill. The rectangular cave has a doorway and is flanked by ‘dwarapalas' on either side. A series of rock-cut caves and monolithic structures standing on rock platforms are present on the northern side of the hill. The imposing figures of the Buddha, seated in a meditation-posture and the stupa are the main attraction for tourists at Bojjannakonda. On top of the hill, there are the ruins of buildings and a vihara (monastery)..

Buddhist monks used to worship on the hill 2,000 years ago. It was originally known as ‘Buddhuni konda' (hill of the Buddha) but it came to be known as ‘Bojjannakonda' in course of time. Large numbers come here on Kanumu day (last day of Pongal) every year and it is celebrated as ‘Theertham'. Buddha Purnima, ‘Karteeka Masam' and festivals also draw people from the neighbouring villages to the site.