The most astonishing wonder is the uniqueness of the Atma abiding in all creation. In a discourse on the Bhagavad Gita, Swami Parthasarathi drew attention to Krishna’s reference to the way people respond and react to this wonderful Atma, which is immortal and subtle. Some perceive the Self as a wonder, some speak of the Atma as a marvel; some hear about it and some others still remain in the dark about this mystery.

Its essence is not to be captured in words. That is why Krishna employs many strategies, analogies, similes, etc., to describe this subtle Atma. The body in which it dwells might die but it is eternal and all-pervading. This Atma cannot be cut or burnt; cannot be moistened or dried. It is immovable and static. By describing such characteristics pertaining to the Atma, which is indweller in each one of us, it is hoped that some aspect of its infinite greatness might be caught in a flash.

Similarly, there is the spark of divinity pervading all aspects of creation as an unseen marvel that is manifest only in effect. What a variety of species in creation! And what a multitude of colour, texture, form or name contained in objects ranging from the gross to the subtle?

Just as carbon manifests both as a piece of charcoal and a diamond, the entire world is described in the scriptures as constituted of ‘nama and rupa’ (name and form). The ebb and flow of life is a constant occurrence even as the waves are formed and disappear in the ocean. The constant processes of birth, growth, decay and death takes place unabatedly. The enormity and grandeur of a Mt. Everest or a Niagara evokes untold wonder and causes a humbling effect in us. To the spiritually evolved, even a mere banana that is hygienically packed and ready for consumption evokes equal wonder. The sun provides vitality for living beings; the clouds shower rains for life to be sustained. Just to register a sight more than a hundred thousand operations take place.

Spiritual evolution takes place in the individual consciousness when one becomes sensitive to the wonder that is inherent in creation.

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