Sankari Krishnan took the audience on a devotional trip. The phrases were mostly short but sweet, bringing out the distinctive shades of the raga. ‘Bhavasagaram Karaieralam’ was swift with attractive kalpanaswaras. ‘Thillai Chidambaramendru’ was set in a leisurely pace.

Gopalakrishna Bharati had distinguished himself as a composer of Tamil kritis with simple and sensitive lyric set to fine melody. A contemporary of the Trinity, his love for the deity of Chidambaram and the musical presentation of Nandanar Charitram are celebrated even today.

Sankari Krishnan took the audience on a devotional trip during her Music Academy concert, which was dedicated to Gopalakrishna Bharati’s compositions. She had chosen three ragas for detailed treatment; Shanmukhapriya, Poorvikalyani and Khambodi.

Raga’s shades

Of the three treatises, Shanmukhapriya was a trifle more dynamic than the others. The phrases were mostly short but sweet, bringing out the distinctive shades of the raga. ‘Bhavasagaram Karaieralam’ was swift with attractive kalpanaswaras. ‘Thillai Chidambaramendru’ was set in a leisurely pace.

Sankari stepped up the Khambodi essay with fast moving motifs leaving little or no space for repose. The popular Thiruvadi Charanam turned out to be the central piece.

A conspicuously tepid niraval at ‘Adutthu Vandal Ennai’ and a swara section at a sluggish pace in the first kalam, became radiant in the second kala swaras. Notably, this part was succinct.

The usually brisk ‘Sabapathikku’ in Aboghi received a caressingly slow touch. Here, even the swaras at the end were pitched on an unhurried tempo. ‘Sivaloga Nathanai Kandu’ in Mayamalavagowla and ‘Vazhi Maraithurukkuthe’ in Natakuranji figured in the early part of the concert.

Pakkala Ramadas almost reproduced Sankari’s vision on his violin, both in raga exposes and swara responses.

The percussion support of Rajasekar on the mridangam was appropriately gentle to suit the theme of the concert.