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Updated: January 1, 2010 13:08 IST

Forms without blemish

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CLASSIC: Shreya Devanath.
Photo: S. Thanthoni
The Hindu CLASSIC: Shreya Devanath. Photo: S. Thanthoni

There were no rough edges in the recital of Shreya Devnath.

Indian Fine Arts Society

An artist hailing from the school of Lalgudi Jayaraman will definitely bear the stamp of quality. Shreya Devnath’s violin solo was the testimony of the meticulous learning she had undergone. The renditions carried the sowkyam of good music and suffused with the classicism of traditional approach.

In fact, Shreya was very careful in her bowing as well as fingering. Her concert started with the Bowli varnam and ended with the Maund tillana both by her guru. The ragas essayed by her were Anandabhairavi and Simhendramadyamam. For a beginner, it is necessary to reproduce kritis

and sangatis without rough edges and to know how to maintain the tempo in a concert format. These were significantly admirable in Shreya’s presentation.

The kalpanaswaras she added to the Dikshitar composition ‘Anandamrithakarshini’ were set on the right track. Her expositions of a minor sketch of Anandabhairavi and the main Simhendramadyamam reiterated that she had comprehended the musical forms of these ragas in the proper perspective and

was equipped to present them on the violin without blemish.

‘Ninne nammithinayya’ of Mysore Vasudevachar and the niraval swaras at ‘Pannakendra sayana’ was enjoyably diligent. Quite a good round of kalpanaswaras was affixed here. Shreya clearly made announcements of the song, raga, tala and composer before every item, a practice worth emulating.

The leisurely impact of ‘Marivere gati’ of Syama Sastri was contrasted by the fast number ‘Paramukamelara’ of Tyagaraja in Surutti. The Bhimplas item ‘Vellai Thamarai’ by Bharatiar gave a balmy effect before the lightening tillana in Maund.

Shreya was supported ably by S. Venkatasubramaniam and Hariharasubramaniam on the mridangam and ghatam; the duo completed the concert with a professional tani avartanam.

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