* That walking encyclopaedia K.V. Ramanathan once again has straightened this column out as he has in the past when it has strayed. This time he tells me that S. Parthasarathy Iyer, the police officer (Miscellany, October 26) belonged to the I.P. (Indian Police) which was a service contemporary with the I.C.S., and not the I.P.S., as mentioned by me, which dates, I presume, to the I.A.S. era. He also tells me that whereas N. Gopalaswamy Iyengar was indeed knighted (as stated in that same column), A. Rangaswami Iyengar was not and, indeed, would never have been, given his rather vocal political views.

* P. Venkataraman writes to say that Natesan Street in Mambalam was not named after G.A. Natesan (Miscellany, October 26). It used to be Natesa Iyer Street, before the caste suffix was removed, and was named after Kadalangudi Natesa Iyer, a popular astrologer, who lived in Kadalangudi House, his residence there. Later, his daughter, Dr. K.N. Saraswathi, had her practice there.

* It was the Rev. C.F. Andrews who persuaded Gandhiji to attend the Second Round Table Conference in London (Miscellany, October 26), writes reader D.B. James. He adds that Andrews also persuaded Gandhi to address the Lancashire millworkers — who were out of work because of his ‘boycott British goods policy’— and explain his reasons. The workers who came “to boo stayed to listen with rapt attention,” James adds.

* In discussing what came up in People’s Park and which still survive (Miscellany, November 9), you have, though mentioning them elsewhere, omitted Ripon Building and Victoria Public Hall — Moore Market, which has not survived, should have also been mentioned — all of which came up at the southern end of the park, built over a filled in lake, points out reader L.O. Da Silva. Mea culpa.