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Updated: December 29, 2009 14:34 IST

Where nursery schools charge more than IITs

PTI
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HIGH ENTRY BARRIERS: Some private nursery schools in Delhi charge fees averaging Rs. 75,000 per year. File photo: G.R.N. Somashekar
The Hindu
HIGH ENTRY BARRIERS: Some private nursery schools in Delhi charge fees averaging Rs. 75,000 per year. File photo: G.R.N. Somashekar

Parents successfully clearing the rigorous nursery school admission process of their wards in Delhi find themselves staring at one last but big hurdle — fees that even top the annual Rs. 50,000 charged for admission by IITs.

With thousands of parents fighting over a few hundred seats in a limited number of good schools, the private institutions call the shots during the admission season.

The current fee structure in the IITs is around Rs. 50,000 per annum. Besides, students pay about Rs. 20,000 annually for other purposes like accommodation, alumni and admission fees.

But when it comes to reputed nursery schools in Delhi and NCR, the figure increases significantly and quotes anywhere around or above Rs. 75,000 a year, which parents have to shell out even after undergoing a rigorous interview and evaluation process.

Rs. 1.7 lakhs-plus per year

For instance, a school in Gurgaon charges Rs. 75,000 as admission fees, while the composite annual fee is Rs. 1,70,000 for 2009-10 school term. Besides, there are extra charges such as Rs. 38,000 to Rs. 44,000 as annual transport fees, Rs. 6,000 to Rs. 9,500 as IT fees every year.

A Noida school charges a one-time admission fee of Rs. 61,000 plus Rs. 26,000 per quarter. Similar is the case with another school in the satellite city which asks Rs. 45,000 as admission fees with an additional quarterly fees of Rs. 11,000.

Delhi Education Minister Arvinder Singh Lovely said he was aware of violations, but his department could only act against a school if it receives complaints from parents.

“If they show us a receipt, we can act on it. Most parents don’t come forward,” Mr. Lovely said.

According to Sumit Vohra, who runs admissionsnursery.com, a website exclusively for parents, the average annual fee for nursery in Delhi and NCR is around Rs. 75,000.

“There is no second thought that the fees are more than what students pay in IITs. Private schools give reasons such as high-class education, comfort and care given to kids. And the Directorate of Education, the highest authority for school education in Delhi, is almost silent in its guidelines about fee structures of schools,” Mr. Vohra said.

While the admission fees add salt to the injuries of parents who had to under go a rigorous evaluation system to get their ward’s admission in good schools, school authorities defend their fee structure saying this is proportionate to the service and education they render.

“High class education”

“We are an eight-hour school having a state-of-art infrastructure and a huge teaching staff. We provide high class education and care to each student, and the amount we ask for that is no way disproportionate,” said Rekha Bakshi, principal of Vasant Valley School.

“If you want better education and service, you need to pay more. The fee is very much reasonable compared to the costs incurred by the school for the child,” said an official at Step By Step School in Noida.

Parents have also accused schools of not giving proper receipts for the amount they deposit.

“A school in Noida asked for Rs. 45,700 as admission fee and Rs. 11,000 as quarterly fees including transport. But they gave receipt for only Rs. 700,” claimed a parent on the website.

“Most of the schools have the same policy and they don’t issue receipt for the total amount they charge for a nursery seat,” said another parent on the site.

“Parents are made to suffer at the hands of the school managements. Despite DoE regulations, there is chaos and uncertainty,” said Vijender Gupta, president of the Delhi Abhibhavak Mahasangh.

Unrecognised schools add to chaos

Another reason for this chaos, experts say, is the number of unrecognised schools that don’t follow DoE guideline. “There are about 1,000 unrecognised schools across Delhi and DoE can’t take any action against them as they don’t fall under the purview the Delhi Education Act, 1973,” Vohra added.

THE EDUCATION ENVIRONMENT CREATED AND ARE BEING PERPETUATED BY THE SO-CALLED ELITE RULING CLASS CAN ONLY BE CORRECTED WHEN ANYONE WITH EXTREMELY BOLD ATTITUDE AND STRONG WILLPOWER FROM THE RANK AND FILE OF -THE BHARAT- COMES TO POWER. THE LIKES OF MANMOHAN, CHIDAMBARAM, MONTEK, SIBBAL AND THE WHOLE BUNCH HAVE TO BE THROWN OUT OF POWER. SOONER THE BETTER. SOME EXTREMELY STEPTS NEEDS TO BE TAKEN IMMEDIATELY:-

1. SIMPLE AND UNDERSTANDABLE TO ALL LEGISLATION SHOULD BE BROUGHT IN WITH A VIEW TO PROVIDE -EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FOR ALL. NO ELITICIM.

2. COMMON SCHOOLING ARRANGEMENT FOR ALL. THERE SHALL BE NO EXISTENCE OF SO CALLED PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

3. ALL THE ASSETS AND PROPERTIES OF THE SCHOOLS RUNNING INTO THE COUNTRY NEEDS TO BE CONVERTED INTO SCHOOLS FOR ALL.

4. EACH AND EVERY CHILD SHOULD BE ADMITTED TO THESE SHOOLS.

5. WELL-TRAINED TEACHING STAFF WITH THE OBJECTIVE SHOULD BE GIVEN RESPONSIBILITY TO IMPART EDUCATION.

ALL KINDS OF ELITICIM PREVALENT NOW IN THE COUNTRY SHOULD IMMEDIATELY BE DEALT WITH STRONG HAND. PARASITE BUNCH OF PEOPLE SHOULD BE GIVEN REAL LIFE LESSONS ON HOW ACTUAL BHARAT HAS BEEN STRUGGLING TO LIFE.

from:  AMAR NATH PRAJAPATI
Posted on: Feb 2, 2011 at 16:04 IST

Why blame the schools for this? If the parent is ready to pay for anything and everything this is what happens... This is a free society. You pay and you reap.. good or bad.

Commonsense should prevail in such cases.

from:  Cheri
Posted on: Jan 3, 2010 at 03:16 IST

I am one of the miserable parents who had to fork out a fortune for nursery admission in Pune. I wonder what is going to happen in future if we do not apply controls on fees of these private schools. As soon as I have an option, I will shift my child to a good government run school. Also, can we go to consumer courts for such issues. Please let us know.

from:  SHRENIK
Posted on: Dec 29, 2009 at 10:38 IST

Isn't is bad that a ministry can only act upon receiving complaint from the parents? Do they even understand why they were being elected in the first place? I wish they could use their power for these issues.

from:  Neelakandan
Posted on: Dec 28, 2009 at 20:59 IST

With these rapidly growing costs, i'm totally becoming clueless on how can a typical middle class family could ever impart the proper education to the next generation.
@Vishwajeet, you are spot on. I do agree with both of your opinions.
Now-a-days parents are feeling proud by mentioning the school/college names in which their wards are studying, even when they are slogging off their butts for paying the school fees. Everybody should contribute to this and make every other parent aware of these facts.

from:  Aditya
Posted on: Dec 28, 2009 at 14:09 IST

This is quite sad. Education has become a business where morality has lost its significance. The sentiment of the career of their child in the parents is being cashed by these so called schools.

from:  Abhilash
Posted on: Dec 28, 2009 at 10:20 IST

Isn't shameful for the education minister that despite he knows schools are charging such high fees, the government is not doing anything ?

Shouldn't government policy & functioning be pro-active ?.

from:  Pramod Bhatotia
Posted on: Dec 27, 2009 at 15:08 IST

Private schools are a good business anywhere in the world, and especially more so in India, abetted by the poor governance and lack of transparency: call it "Indian values and culture" if you will. The Indian International schools have exported this Indian culture to other countries through NRIs craving for CBSE and ICSE education and other NRIs cashing in on NRI parents. But now, these other countries are learning fast about how to control the excesses of these private education extortionists. India sadly is letting these "unrecognised schools" thrive. What a tragedy for Indian education.

from:  Mohit
Posted on: Dec 27, 2009 at 13:30 IST

This self financing private management schools , seeking 50 or 80 thousand rupees for an admission of L.K.G is monstrous inexactitude perversely dignified. We can not stem the rot since now we are in an open economy brought on us by us in the name of globalization .To put in plainly ,those who are able to make more money can survive, others could live with subsides as a vote-catching device employed by the Govt.Now new phenomenon is health insurance for the poor- instead of improving the Govt hospitals and Govt itself going for the private health coverage.All these suggest categorically that nothing would improve except the palliatives for the middle and poor class.

from:  uthamanarayanan
Posted on: Dec 27, 2009 at 11:17 IST

One solution to this problem is improving the education in government schools.
Secondly, parents have to realize that children learn not much from school but from their behaviour, neighbours and interacting with other children

from:  Vishwajeet Kumar
Posted on: Dec 26, 2009 at 16:12 IST

It's a pathetic situation across the country. In the name of 'quality' education, the so-called corporate schools are doing a brisk 'business'.

from:  S.M. Ahmed
Posted on: Dec 23, 2009 at 13:16 IST
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