A young man, kicked out of home by his father and stepmother, joins a gang headed by his friend, a moneylender. He falls in love with a girl residing in the neighbourhood. At one point, he comes across a crime broker, who offers him a huge sum of money to kill a contestant in a local body election. The deal will help him settle down with his sweetheart and also free him from the world of crime. Will he go ahead with the plan?

One is not certain what the director's intentions are until the last scene where he states what he intends to communicate. Nanda Nandhitha is lacking in most departments, including casting, cinematography and the script. Even the statutory warnings which need to be screened every time a character is shown smoking or drinking alcohol are missing. The manner in which the heroine's brother is introduced in the film, the way he is attacked by goons, declared dead by his mother and then brought back to life later makes one lose whatever little interest one has in the plot.

The Tamil that Hemachandran, who plays Nanda, speaks is crass in the initial scenes. Meghana Raj's performance as Nandhitha is probably one of the few strengths of the movie. She plays her part to perfection. However, as the film lacks a good plot and a tight script, her performance goes waste. The only other commendable performance in the film is that of Nasser, who plays the crime broker.

It is evident that the director has a fascination for breaking glass bottles, as every fight sequence in the film has bottles in all shapes and sizes being broken. Junior artists in the stunt sequences need to be lauded for their efforts. Emil's music is good in parts. The item number, in particular, is catchy and is bound to be fancied by youngsters.

Nanda Nandhitha

Genre: Drama

Director: Ram Shiva

Cast: Hemachandran, Meghana Raj, Nasser, Shanmugharajan, Surya Prathap, Muthukaalai, Sudha and Hemalatha

Storyline: The sad tale of an individual who takes to violence to make it big in life.

Bottomline: Lacks focus

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Telugu Cinema ReviewsOctober 18, 2011