The Businessman has a mix of action, image, dialogue and montage but what makes it entertaining is that all the above quantities are inextricably bound and linked together at every level with an admirably tight script. It is a regular story but structurally, technically and content wise, the director makes no mistakes. He puts the passion of Neninthe, entertainment of Dhookudu and structure of Pokiri to churn out a story that really means business. The film benefits from other pre-release factors like Mahesh's super success of Dhookudu, Thaman's ‘inspired'tunes that have already become a big hit and finally the lessons that Puri Jagannadh had learnt from his recent string of flops.

The film has no frills, no vulgar wastage and the hero is practically in every frame; you hear only his voice, he looks good, sounds good, he also steals the comedian's job. The story is woven around a man who is hungry for power and grows by leaps and bounds to become a mafia don at a time when the competition is zilch in Mumbai. With little brawn and more brain he becomes a successful businessman, as crime is his business.

The thrills for the audience, amoral enjoyment arrives with every step that Surya (Mahesh) climbs, he has the uncanny ability to deceive, to lie convincingly on all scales, as though this was second nature. Yet he is compelling when he speaks the truth. Mahesh plays it straight. His growth should have been slightly slow in the first few minutes allowing the audience to settle down with his character.

The choreography is disappointing. No complaints on Kajal Agarwal's work, but the innocence in her eyes is gone. Ayesha who plays her friend is irritatingly screechy. The film has been given an A certificate not for violence or obscenity but for the dialogues that have the unmistakable Puri Jagan touch — rustic, raw and very profane.

Jagan repeats most of the Pokiri team — Nasser, Prakash Raj, Sayaji Shinde, Subburaju and Brahmaji. However, there is no hangover as all the performances are fresh. The director's son Aakash who worked in Lotus Pond plays the young Mahesh here. Shweta Baradwaj's We Love Bad Boys borders on the vulgar, and there are scenes where the hero rolls out expletives, in muted fashion though the lip movement makes it very clear what the character is saying. Smart work, Puri.

The director's tribute to Mumbai mafia redefines a cool and a brisk flourish. It seems like Puri cannot resist giving the hero's character a Robinhood touch. All in all, The Businessman is a good festival serving of cinema that brings back director Puri Jagan in form and officially crowns the hero for delivering two back-to-back hits.