Markets across Europe heaved a collective sigh of relief as Germany’s top court ruled in favour of the constitutionality of a permanent Euro-zone rescue fund. The court rejected attempt to stop the ratification of the 500 billion euro European Stability Mechanism (ESM) but did impose conditions on its use.

The Federal Constitutional Court in Karlsruhe, on Wednesday, set a cap of 190 billion euro to be set on German liabilities before the ESM can be ratified. But it said it would not stand in the way if Parliament decided to appropriate extra funds to the mechanism. A conservative lawmaker and members of the opposition had brought a legal challenge to the ESM being adopted by Germany on the grounds that Germany should not be paying for the financial profligacy of others and that such a move could lead to hyperinflation, similar to what was witnessed during the Weimar Republic in the 1930s.

The cases were filed after German lawmakers approved the ESM and the fiscal pact, a deficit-control treaty designed to impose budget discipline on European Union member states. Almost 40,000 signed a petition supporting a constitutional complaint filed by political group “Mehr Demokratie e.V.” Other plaintiffs include opposition party Die Linke as well as Peter Gauweiler, a lawmaker from Merkel’s CSU Bavarian sister party.

The challengers argued that the crisis-fighting legislation transfers constitutionally mandated authority from German lawmakers and undermines democratic rule. The court was however clear in its rejection of the complaint. “The review has concluded that the laws that were challenged, with high probability, do not violate the constitution,” Chief Justice Andreas Vosskuhle told the court. “Hence, the motions for a temporary injunction were to be rejected.” The judges also said that Germany must state when ratifying that it won’t be felt bound by the treaty unless these reservations are efficiently met.

Bloomberg reported that “the legal challenge to the planned rescue fund highlights bailout fatigue in Europe’s largest economy and delayed efforts by Merkel and other euro-area policy makers to stem the region’s debt crisis.”

Stocks and the euro rose after the ruling. The single currency gained 0.3 per cent to $1.2896 at 10:46 a.m. in Berlin, while the Stoxx Europe 600 Index rose 0.7 per cent.

However, some uncertainty remained on the limit of Germany’s contribution to the ESM because of the clause capping how much the German government commit in the immediate future. The judges also said that Germany must state when ratifying that it won’t be felt bound by the treaty unless these reservations are efficiently met.